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NEWPORT, R.I. - U.S. Naval War College (NWC) presented British naval historian N.A.M. Rodger with the Hattendorf Prize for his contributions to maritime history, Oct. 20.

NEWPORT, R.I. (Oct. 20, 2011) During a brief ceremony at the 20th International Seapower Symposium, U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert and the British Royal Navy's First Sea Lord, Adm. Sir Mark Stanhope, join the Naval War College's President Rear Admiral John N. Christenson and Professor John B. Hattendorf in recognizing Rodger as the inaugural Hattendorf Prize Laureate. (Photo by Logistics Specialist 1st Class John Stone)During a brief ceremony at the 20th International Seapower Symposium, U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert and the British Royal Navy's First Sea Lord, Adm. Sir Mark Stanhope, joined the Naval War College's President Rear Admiral John N. Christenson and Professor John B. Hattendorf in recognizing Rodger as the inaugural Hattendorf Prize Laureate.

Rodger is a fellow of All Soul's College at Oxford University and of the British Academy, the U.K.'s London-based national organization for distinguished scholars in the humanities and social sciences. Rodger has researched extensively the naval history of Britain, with his works spanning nearly 1,400 years of history.

"It is particularly appropriate for the Naval War College to make this announcement here at this symposium," said Christenson. "This prize is made for world-class achievement in original research that contributes to a deeper historical understanding of the broad context and interrelationships involved in the roles, contributions, limitations, and uses of the sea services in history."

Rodger told the audience of maritime leaders from more than 110 nations around the world that he was honored to be presented the award in front of such an august international delegation.
The Hattendorf Prize includes a bronze medal designed by Anna Hattendorf, Professor John B. Hattendorf's daughter.  Established on Dec. 7, 2010, the award was made possible through the generous support of the Naval War College Foundation.
"I've often thought naval historians are able to do more service to navies than navies realize," Rodger said. "I like to take the opportunities that come my way to tell admirals this, but I must say, I never dreamt I should find myself with the opportunity to say this to all the admirals in the whole world who matter."

Christenson told the international delegation of naval and coast guard officers that the prize reflects the essence of Professor John B. Hattendorf's long legacy of scholarship and service to the U.S. Navy, the college, and the local community. He first joined the Naval War College faculty as a lieutenant in 1972 and has been the Ernest J. King Professor of Maritime History at NWC since 1984 and director of the Naval War College Museum since 2003.

Christenson recognized the great generosity of the donor, Pam Ribbey, whose late grandfather, Captain Charles H. Maddox, was a 1935 and 1939 Naval War College graduate and a faculty member from 1939 to 1941. The donation of the prize was made in memory of Capt. Maddox, who played an instrumental role in intelligence collaboration between the U.S. Navy and the Royal Navy in the Pacific in the late 1930s and was serving at Pearl Harbor during the attack. Recognizing her grandfather's service, Ribbey endowed the Prize on the anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, Dec. 7, 2010. This endowment fund will allow the Naval War College to award the Prize at two-year intervals, providing a $10,000 cash prize with a citation and a bronze medal.

By James E. Brooks, Naval War College Public Affairs
Posted by Cmdr. Carla McCarthy