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From Cybersecurity to Cyberwar
An EMC Chair-Sponsored Workshop
16-17 September 2010
 
Apart from the cultural impacts of cyberspace, there is also a dark side of the cyber world wherein hackers, phishing scam artists, and transnational crime groups harness the technology. Through Trojan horses, criminals and spies gain access to government and private computer networks. Through viruses and denial of service attacks, individuals and groups can disrupt governments and corporations. And through spyware or government surveillance programs, the cherished civil liberty of privacy is subverted. Yet cyber is not just a personal issue, but a national security issue, too.
 
In the cyber world, individual hackers tend to pose the greatest danger to cyber security, but governments now include cyber war in their planning and operations. The most recent example of this was the cyber attack that accompanied Russia’s invasion of Georgia in 2008. As Russian tanks and aircraft were entering Georgian territory, cyber warriors attacked the Georgian Ministry of Defense. Though it had a minimal effect, the attack was a harbinger; future conflicts will have both a physical dimension and a virtual dimension. As governments and militaries embrace technology for efficiency and effect, they also become vulnerable to cyber threats. OPNAV N2/N6 Vice Admiral Dorsett said, “Our adversaries…are eroding what I think are some of our longstanding warfighting advantages by leveraging low cost capabilities to disrupt — or potentially deny our communications. So I do think in some respects, we are in a war; our networks are being probed and penetrated on a daily basis. We haven’t seen truly crippling attacks on our networks, but I grow increasingly concerned about the defenses of our networks.” With this in mind, the EMC Chair will convene a workshop with experts from academia, policy institutions, the IT industry, and the military to consider the evolution of threats to cyberspace, discuss methods to defend cyberspace, place cyber operations in the context of international law, and debate visions of cyberwar.
 
Throughout the workshop, participants will be guided by the following questions:
 
  • What roles have national cyber capabilities played in contemporary conflict?
  • In what new ways are intelligence services using cyber capabilities?
  • Is cyberspace defensible?
  • What are the limits of current strategies, concepts, organizations, and thinking about cybersecurity?
  • How should we apply principles of jus ad bellum and jus in bello in cyberspace?
  • How should we view the principles of necessity and proportionality in cyberspace?
  • What would cyberwar look like?
 
Agenda
 
Thursday, 16 September
 
1000-1005: Welcome to the Naval War College
 
1005-1030: Workshop Scope and Introductions
 
1030-1200: FACETS OF CYBERSECURITY
“Game Theory and Cybercrime: Lessons for the Real World”
“Confluence of Cyber Crime and Terrorism”
“FISMA and Cloud Computing”
 
1200-1300: Lunch
 
1315-1430: CYBERSPACE AND NATIONAL CAPABILITIES
 “Toward a Theory of Cyberpower”
“Cyber Techniques and Intelligence Tradecraft”                                       
 
1430-1445: Break
 
1445-1615: PROTECTING CYBERSPACE
“Cyber Deterrence”
“Domestic Cyber Security Design”
“Balancing Security and Usability”
 
Friday, 17 September
 
0900-1000: THE LAW OF WAR AND CYBERSPACE
 “An SOS for Cyberspace"
“The Seam between Cyber Peacetime Security and Cyberwar”
 
1000-1030: Break
 
1030-1200: VISIONS OF CYBER WAR
“Speculative Security: Science Fiction and the Imagination of Cyberwar"
“Warfare in the Information Age”
 “A Strategy for Cyber Defense”
 
1200-1300: Lunch
 
1300: Concluding Remarks