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Foundation

Course Catalog for 2011/2012

 

Table of Contents

  1. History
  2. Administration
  3. Mission, Vision, Goals and Objectives
    1. Mission
    2. Vision
    3. Goals and Objectives
  4. Academic Program
    1. Joint Professional Military Education
    2. Naval War College Degree
    3. Academic Year
    4. Core Curriculum
    5. Senior-Level PME/JPME Outcomes
    6. Symposia and Conferences
  5. Academic Policy
    1. Admission Policy
    2. Examination and Grading
    3. Advanced Research Program
    4. Degree & Diploma Requirements
    5. Transcripts and Transfer Credit
    6. Academic Recognition
    7. Academic Honor Code
  6. Academic Departments and Courses
    1. Strategy and Policy
    2. National Security Affairs (NSA)
      1. National Security Decision Making (NSDM)
      2. Theater Security Decision Making (TSDM)
    3. Joint Military Operations
    4. Operational Level Programs
    5. Electives Program
    6. Special Research Programs
    7. Regional & Specialized Study Groups
    8. Reserve Component JPME I Courses
  7. College of Distance Education
    1. Fleet Seminar Program
    2. Graduate Degree Program
    3. Web-Enabled Correspondence Program
    4. CD-ROM Based Correspondence Program
    5. Naval War College at the Naval Postgraduate School
  8. International Programs
    1. Naval Command College
    2. Naval Staff College
  9. Student Body
    1. College of Naval Warfare
    2. College of Naval Command and Staff
    3. Naval Command College
    4. Naval Staff College
    5. College of Distance Education
  10. College of Operational and Strategic Leadership
    1. Combined Force Maritime Component Commander Course
    2. Joint Force Maritime Component Commander Course
    3. Maritime Staff Operators Course
    4. Assist and Assess Team
  11. Center for Naval Warfare Studies
    1. Wargaming Department
    2. Warfare Analysis and Research Department
    3. Strategic Research Development
    4. Historian
    5. Naval War College Press
    6. International Law Department
    7. Office of Naval Intelligence Detachment, Newport
  12. Henry E. Eccles Library
  13. Senior Enlisted Academy
  14. CNO Strategic Studies Group
  15. Naval War College Museum
  16. Naval War College Foundation
  17. Student Expectations
    1. Student Orientation
    2. Student Support
    3. Student Counseling
    4. Religious Activities
    5. Student Health Services
    6. Recreation and Extracurricular Activities
    7. Social Activities
    8. Athletic Activities and Facilities
    9. Student Organizations
    10. Registrar
  18. Alumni Affairs
  19. Faculty
    1. Academic and Administrative Leadership
    2. Joint Military Operations
    3. National Security Affairs
    4. Strategy and Policy
    5. International Programs
    6. College of Distance Education
    7. Center for Naval Warfare Studies
    8. College of Operational & Strategic Leadership
    9. Maritime Advanced Warfighting School
  20. Building Data and Maps
  21. Accreditation
  22. Inquiries about the Institution
  1. History

        On October 6, 1884, Secretary of the Navy William E. Chandler signed General Order 325, which began by simply stating: "A college is hereby established for an advanced course of professional study for naval officers, to be known as the Naval War College.”  As its first president, Rear Adm. Stephen B. Luce set a course for the Naval War College which endures to this day. He mused, "Fancy a university man aspiring to the honors of the legal profession and ignoring the law school and the science of law. . . . It must strike anyone who thinks about it as extraordinary that we members of the profession of arms should never have undertaken the study of our real business.”  

        Luce’s zeal for the Naval War College emanated throughout the faculty and its subsequent presidents.  Alfred Thayer Mahan, a faculty member who later became president of the college, delivered a series of lectures that were published several years later as a book in 1890: The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783.  Almost overnight, it gave Mahan a position of prominence and very rapidly promoted the respect the Naval War College received.

        Despite wide acceptance of Mahan's views, the early years of the Naval War College were not without difficulties. The college mainly faced internal opposition from within the Navy, as many officers firmly believed that everything an officer needed to know was technical and could be learned at sea.  The college employed a technique of tactical and operational analysis to acquaint officers with procedures for estimating military situations, determining action, drafting appropriate implementing orders, and evaluating results. This was accompanied by an elaborate program of war gaming, pioneered by the German’s as Kriegspiel and first introduced in the U.S. Navy at Newport in 1886.

        Naval War College war games quickly captured the imagination of professionals and laymen alike. Theodore Roosevelt wrote prior to one of his four visits to the Naval War College, "I want to time my visit so as to see one of your big strategic games." By August 1917, these techniques made the Naval War College a laboratory for strategic and operational planning, and almost every war plan adopted between 1890 and 1917 was prepared by Naval War College officers, in cooperation with the Office of Naval Intelligence and the Navy’s General Board.

        The college excelled in times of peace before significant military conflict.  After World War II, Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz said of the war in the Pacific: “The war with Japan had been reenacted in the game rooms here [at the Naval War College] in so many different ways that nothing that happened during the war was a surprise—absolutely nothing except the kamikaze tactics toward the end of the war; we had not visualized those."  In the years after World War II, the role of the military changed rapidly, and the College underwent appropriate change, providing preparation and analysis for the Cold War era.  In 1948, the college began publishing its highly respected journal, The Naval War College Review and, in 1956, the Naval Command College was founded, as a course of study for senior international naval officers.  In its first half century, half of the graduates became admirals and about ten percent went on to become chief of their navy. The College of Naval Command and Staff, enrolling mid-grade officers, emphasized the operational and tactical elements of command; while the College of Naval Warfare for senior officers stressed larger policy, administrative, and strategic questions.

        During the Cold War, the college added courses in international law, international relations, economics, comparative culture, and military management. In 1972, the College entirely revamped its academic curriculum to focus on strategy and policy, defense economics and decision making, and naval operations.  By the ‘80s, the college was established as a focal point, stimulus, and major source of strategic thinking within the U.S. Navy.  In the 1990s, the college was accredited to award its own graduates a Master of Arts degree in national security affairs and strategic studies. The Senior Enlisted Academy opened in 1981; an entity now directly associated with the college and meant to prepare senior enlisted personnel for mid-level management.

        Following the recognition for a need for a more robust contribution to joint command and control, the college initiated programs designed to strengthen Navy combat readiness at the operational level of war through education and training of joint force maritime component commanders and their staffs.  The Naval War College also began to lead an effort to develop a coherent leadership development continuum focused on developing leaders of character who are prepared for operational and strategic leadership challenges. In 2006, took initiative in establishing its China Maritime Studies Institute to improve mutual understanding and maritime cooperation with China.

       Now in its second century of service to the U.S. Navy and the nation, the Naval War College continues to prepare its students not for their next assignments but for the remainder of their careers, by providing them with a professional military education second to none—one that is based on the intellectual flexibility that flows from a clear understanding of the fundamental principles that have governed national security affairs in peace and in war throughout history.

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  2. Administration

         The president of the college is accountable for all operations of the college and is responsible for education and research, analysis and gaming activities that contribute to its mission accomplishment. Normally a rear admiral, the president exercises oversight across all elements of the college, subject to broad policy guidance from the Chief of Naval Operations.  The president also maintains professional contacts with the fleet and military and civilian institutions of higher learning in the United States and around the world. The selection of the provost, deans, department chairs, directors and other key personnel is at the discretion of the president, as outlined in the faculty handbook. The college’s draft mission encompasses five key functions: PME/JPME; research analysis and gaming; support combat readiness; enhance maritime security cooperation; and mission support.

        The president of the college is assisted in his governance by an executive leadership team consisting of the provost, deputy to the president/chief of staff, the dean of academic affairs, the dean of the Center for Naval Warfare Studies and the dean, College of Operational and Strategic Leadership, who are responsible to him for their respective functions and supporting tasks. The expanded management group includes the associate provost, the dean of students, department chairs and college directors, assistant deans, division heads, and special advisors to the president. The provost is the chief operating officer of the college.  As such, the provost is responsible to the president for the effective and efficient functioning of the college.

        As the chief operating officer, the provost is also responsible to the president to ensure that the college accomplishes its mission, functions and supporting tasks. Because of this and in order to link the college’s operations that support its mission accomplishment with its financial resource management processes, the provost exercises oversight of the preparation of the college’s annual budget as well as its participation in the Department of Defense Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution (PPBES) process described in Chapter 11. The provost is also the principal assistant to the president for education and is responsible for the well-being and effective use of the faculty, academic staff, and student body.

        The provost performs the duties normally associated with a dean of faculty. The provost acts as the executive agent for the president in educational matters. The dean of academic affairs, working through the provost, is responsible to the president for the establishment and maintenance of academic policy, standards and procedures.

        The dean of academic affairs directs and coordinates the professional military education programs of the college. The dean of academic affairs approves the resident and nonresident academic curricula of the College of Naval Command and Staff (CNC&S), Naval Command College (NCC), Naval Staff College (NSC), and the College of Distance Education (CDE). The dean of academic affairs, through the academic department chairs and college directors, coordinates all academic matters, including course content, teaching methodology, and scheduling; directs evaluations of the course of instruction; ensures the academic programs are provided adequate library support; and maintains close professional relationships with other military and civilian educational institutions.

        The provost and dean of academic affairs are supported in their duties by the dean of students, chairs of the core academic departments of Joint Military Operations (JMO), National Security Decision Making (NSDM), and Strategy and Policy (S&P), the directors of the two international colleges (NCC and NSC), the director of CDE, one associate deans of academics, one assistant dean of academics, the library director, and the registrar. The provost also is advised by a small group of advisors representing the other U.S. military services and the State Department. The dean of academic affairss supervises the work of the college’s academic and military chairs and the academic faculty, who are responsible for the curricula for the academic programs, as well as its development and teaching.

        The dean of international programs is responsible for sustaining and strengthening international programs to enhance navy-to-navy relationships, the Joint Security Assistance Training Plan, and maritime and theater security cooperation. The college has an associate provost and an associate dean of academics for electives and directed research to help provide focus and continuity to academic administration. The associate provost is responsible for leading efforts to evaluate institutional and educational effectiveness and sustaining accreditation standards. He also ensures proper management of those functions specifically related to joint education and the Navy’s PME Continuum. The associate dean of academics for electives and directed research manages the electives program as well as the directed research program.      
                                                   
        For the research, analysis, and gaming function, the dean of the Center for Naval Warfare Studies directs directs in the development of concepts concerning national security and strategic thought, and of ideas for the employment of joint and naval forces in peace and war. His duties include coordinating all advanced research activities at the college by maintaining active contact with the staffs of CNO, the commandant of the Marine Corps, fleet commanders, and other U.S. and foreign government agencies concerned with strategy, operations, logistics, international law, technology, and political-military affairs. Additionally, the dean is responsible for publishing the Naval War College Review, the Newport Papers monograph series, and books; developing annual budgets supporting war gaming for research; providing curricular support to the teaching departments; and encouraging contributions to strategic thought and research.

        The dean of the Center for Naval Warfare Studies oversees the efforts of a full-time, government-funded research, analysis and gaming faculty and staff organized into six departments: Strategic Research, War Gaming, International Law, Warfare Analysis and Research, Naval War College Press, and Maritime History, as well as a detachment of the Office of Naval Intelligence. The research, analysis and gaming faculty directly support the college’s academic programs by teaching electives, advising student research, participating in intersessional conferences, and conducting or coordinating lectures of opportunity, in addition to performing their regular duties.

    The Dean of the College of Operational and Strategic Leadership (COSL) directs and coordinates efforts in the Leadership continuum of Professional Military Education (PME) for Navy officer and enlisted personnel including education on ethics and character development; operational level educational programs including Joint/Combined Force Maritime Component Commander (JFMCC/CFMCC) courses, Maritime Staff Operators Course (MSOC) and the Assist and Assessment Team (AAT); Navy Senior Mentor program; Senior Enlisted Academy (SEA); Stockdale Group advanced research program in operational level leadership and is responsible for hosting the NWC Ethics Conference.   

        The deputy to the president/chief of staff is the principal assistant to the president for the mission support and is responsible for the security and safety of the Naval War College and its personnel. The deputy to the president/chief of staff is responsible for directing all administrative and support functions; implementing policies for the distribution and effective management of personnel and material in coordination with the provost; coordinating all internal and external nonacademic programs and functions; monitoring administrative and support programs for students, faculty, and staff; maintaining a comprehensive security program; and providing support for special activities pertinent to the management and administration of the college. These tasks involve the oversight of facilities, manpower and management, information resources, administrative services, publication and printing, and graphic arts. The deputy to the president is assisted by a mixture of naval and civilian department heads who manage the support infrastructure. Subject to the orders of the president, the deputy contributes to the effective functioning of the college and is the prime coordinating agent with the Newport Team and the Naval Station Newport. As chief of staff, he manages the supporting staff.

        The director, Senior Enlisted Academy is responsible for the education and operation of the Senior Enlisted Academy (SEA). As of 1 October 2008, SEA shifted to the Naval War College from the Navy Education and Training Command. SEA provides a fully in-resident, five-week educational opportunity for senior chiefs and selected chiefs (and their other service and partner nation equivalents) and a blended program consisting of a distance learning element followed by a two-week in-resident opportunity.

        The college’s long-standing partner relationship transitioned to a command relationship to better execute the enlisted sailor PME continuum.

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  3. Mission, Vision, Goals and Objectives

    This section outlines the Naval War College's current mission, vision, goals and objectives.

    1. Mission

      The mission of the Naval War College is expressed in its Mission, Functions, and Task statement (OPNAVINST 54.027D):

       The mission of the U.S. Naval War College is to:

       Develop strategic and operational leaders: The College shall provide professional military education programs that are current, rigorous, relevant, and accessible to the maximum number of qualified U.S. officers and Navy enlisted personnel, civilian employees of the U.S. Government and non-governmental organizations, and international officers. The desired effect is a group of leaders of character who have trust and confidence in each other and are operationally and strategically minded, critical thinkers, proficient in joint matters, and skilled naval and joint warfighters.

       Help CNO define the future Navy and its roles and missions: The College shall conduct research, analysis, and gaming to support the requirements of the Secretary of the Navy, the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), the Combatant Commanders, the Navy Component Commanders, the Navy’s numbered fleet commanders, other Navy and Marine Corps commanders, the U.S. Intelligence Community, and other departments and agencies of the U.S. Government. The desired effect is a program of focused, forward-thinking and timely research, analysis, and gaming that anticipates future operational and strategic challenges; develops and assesses strategic and operational concepts to overcome those challenges; assesses the risk associated with these concepts; and provides analytical products that inform the Navy’s leadership and help shape key decisions.

       Support combat readiness: The College shall conduct training, education, leadership and assessment activities to support the ability of the Navy’s Joint Force Maritime and Navy Component Commanders to function effectively as operational commanders. This effort shall include supporting the needs of the Combatant Commanders, Navy Component Commanders, and the Navy’s numbered fleet commanders for operational planning, analysis, and war gaming to respond to emerging operational requirements. The desired effect is to improve the capability of Navy commanders to lead maritime, joint and combined forces and their staff members to plan, execute and assess and function cohesively as a maritime headquarters organization.

       Strengthen maritime security cooperation: The College shall bring together senior and intermediate level naval officers from other countries to develop leaders for high command in their navies; understand and evolve operational planning methods; create opportunities for expanded, high-level professional exchange through venues such as the International Sea Symposium, Regional Symposia, formal college-to-college relationships with international counterparts, international publications, and alumni relations; and establish a regional studies structure to focus resources for greater impact in building and extending maritime partnerships. The desired effect is to build more robust and productive international maritime relationships, to improve the ability to operate effectively with partner nations, and to improve maritime security cooperation.

       Deliver excellent support: To discharge successfully these primary mission responsibilities, the College shall strive for excellence in organization, processes, and infrastructure to enable mission accomplishment. The desired effect is to remain an exemplary steward of the resources entrusted to us and fully accomplish our mission both efficiently and effectively.

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    2. Vision

          The 2007-8 strategic planning process produced a new vision for the College.  Very succinctly, the leadership’s intent is that:

         The Naval War College will be the Navy and nation’s first choice for educating and inspiring innovative leaders who think strategically, are masters of the operational art, and lead with confidence maritime, joint, interagency, and multinational operations to achieve national security objectives.

         We will be foremost in providing the nation’s military leaders and statesmen with rigorous analysis, independent research and robust war gaming to clarify and resolve critical national security issues.  As the intellectual center of the Navy, we will play an indispensable role in developing leaders, crafting strategy, and building trust and confidence—the foundation of enduring relationships of inestimable value to our nation and the world.

         Our purpose remains as clear today as when the college was founded: to lead the world in the conduct of “original research in all questions relating to war and to statesmanship connected with war, or the prevention of war.”

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    3. Goals and Objectives

      Goals

        The College’s Strategic Plan, 2008-12 formalized goals, objectives, and milestones directed to continuously improve every aspect of College’s life to produce the finest product possible.  Goals and objectives were developed to bridge the gap between where we are now and where we want to be in the future.  They reflect those things that must be done in order to fill that gap.  Neither a list of functions and tasks nor an attempt to describe all existing programs and ongoing efforts, the goals that follow have been developed to require specific future actions that are measurable and support our vision of the Naval War College’s future.

      [NOTE: LEAD = Accountable Executive Agent; SUPPORT = Contributory/coordinating Responsibility]

      Goal 1. Develop a group of leaders of character, who have trust and confidence in each other and are operationally and strategically minded, critical thinkers, proficient in joint matters and skilled naval and joint warfighters.  LEAD: Dean of Academic Affairs

      Objectives:
      1.1. Recruit, hire, and sustain a world class faculty and staff as the critical element in producing and delivering the highest quality education.
      1.2. Develop and manage current, relevant, and rigbooksorous curricula for Navy and Joint Professional Military Education (PME) and the Navy’s PME Continuum for officers, enlisted personnel, and civilian employees.
      1.3. Deliver the highest quality education to resident student at levels appropriate to their progression along the Navy’s PME Continuum.
      1.4. Deliver the highest quality education to non-resident student at levels appropriate to their progression along the Navy’s PME Continuum.
      1.5. Build relationships with and represent the Navy and the Naval War College to external agencies and organizations pertinent to the NWC’s education mission.
      1.6. Provide academic services and infrastructure necessary to support resident and non-resident education.

      Goal 2. Provide a program of focused, forward-thinking and timely research, analysis, and gaming that anticipates future operational and strategic challenges; develops and assesses strategic and operational concepts to overcome those challenges; assesses the risk associated with these concepts; and provides analytical products that inform the Navy’s leadership and help shape key decisions.  LEAD: Dean, CNWS

      Objectives:
      2.1. Recruit, hire, and sustain a world class faculty and staff as the critical element in producing and delivering focused, relevant research and analysis.
      2.2. Assess future operational and strategic challenges and develop and assess strategic and operational concepts to overcome those challenges.
      2.3. Serve as the center of excellence in the Navy on international maritime law and the law of armed conflict.
      2.4. Provide war gaming facilities and appropriate modeling and simulation systems as well as warfare analysis and decision support capabilities to support senior Navy leadership and other national security decision-makers on a wide range of operational and strategic challenges.
      2.5. Build relationships with external agencies and organizations pertinent to the NWC’s research mission and conduct outreach activities to wider audiences as appropriate. 

      Goal 3. Improve the capability of Navy commanders to lead maritime, joint and combined forces and their staff members to plan, execute and assess and function cohesively as a maritime headquarters organization.  LEAD: Director, JFMCC

      Objectives:
      3.1. Develop and manage focused, current, and relevant education for maritime component commanders and their staffs.
      3.2. Deliver the highest quality education focused on theater-level combat leadership in the maritime domain to international and U.S. flag and general officers and their staffs.
      3.3. Build relationships with and represent the Navy and the Naval War College to external agencies and organizations pertinent to joint/combined warfighting education. 

      Goal 4. Build and strengthen national and international maritime relationships and to improve the ability of U.S. and partner nations to operate together in the maritime domain.  LEAD: ADOA International Programs

      Objectives:
      4.1. Develop and deliver a PME program for selected military officers from allied and friendly nations.
      4.2. Develop and deliver outreach activities to engage senior maritime leaders from allied and friendly nations.
       

      Goal 5. Manage and administer human, physical, and financial resources in accordance with Department of the Navy, higher headquarters, and internal guidance, and, as required to accomplish the NWC’s mission functions and tasks.  LEAD: Deputy & Chief of Staff

      Objectives:
      5.1. Maintain and sustain a world class physical and informational infrastructure to enable the NWC mission.
      5.2. Provide administrative services and support to enhance the performance of NWC employees and support of students, customers, and the public.
      5.3. Exercise vigilant stewardship of financial resources and articulate legitimate requirements for additional resources as needed.

      The planning process that produced this plan took care to ensure that naval and joint issues are woven throughout the plan and are integral to our mission, vision, goals, and objectives.  This emphasis is not new, but reflects a continuing commitment to naval and joint education that began in earnest in 1973 with a course based upon the notion that the College educates students “how to win wars” using broad concepts of political, military, and economic strategies matched to national policy objectives.  From this viewpoint, and fully supported by historical case studies from the Peloponnesian Wars to the Gulf War, the advantages of joint force employment naturally emerged. 

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  4. Academic Program

      The missions of the Naval War College are to develop strategic and operational leaders; help CNO define the future Navy and its roles and missions; support combat readiness and strengthen maritime security cooperation.

        The college accomplishes these missions by maintaining a highly-qualified civilian and military faculty. The college’s three departments, Strategy and Policy; National Security Decision Making; and Joint Military Operations, along with the College of Distance Education, the Center for Naval Warfare Studies, and International Programs provide a plethora of opportunities to prepare graduates to make advanced, informed decisions in the area of military operations.

    1. Joint Professional Military Education

      Joint professional military education consists of the rigorous and thorough instruction and examination of officers of the armed forces in an environment designed to promote a theoretical and practical in depth understanding of joint matters and, specifically, of the subject matter covered. The subject matter to be covered by joint professional military education shall include at least tjmohe following:

      (1) National military strategy
      (2) Joint planning at all levels of war
      (3) Joint doctrine
      (4) Joint command and control
      (5) Joint force and joint requirements development

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    2. Naval War College Degree

          The Naval War College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges to award qualified resident U.S. graduates with a Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies and accredited by the chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff to award JPME Phase I credit for the intermediate program and JPME Phase II credit for the senior course. Graduates from the international programs receive an NWC diploma.  The Naval War College is also accredited to award the same Master of Arts degree to qualified non-resident students who complete the Fleet Seminar Program, are admitted to the non-resident Graduate Degree Program, and who then complete the Electives Program requirements for the degree.

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    3. Academic Year

          NWC convocations are traditionally scheduled in August, and the majority of students graduate the following June. However, two smaller classes of senior and intermediate-grade U.S. officers begin their academic years in either the winter or spring trimesters, which begin in November and March.

          The 10-month curriculum for resident students is divided into trimesters of three to four months. Additionally, three abbreviated 12-day core curriculum courses are offered annually for U.S. military reservists.

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    4. Core Curriculum

          The Naval War College has three departments, Strategy and Policy; Joint Military Operations; and National Security Decision Making, each with separate faculty.

      Strategy and Policy

          The Strategy and Policy curriculum teaches students to think strategically and prepare them for positions of strategic leadership. Strategy is the relationship between war’s purpose, objective, and means. The course is designed to sharpen the student’s ability to assess how alternative strategic courses of action achieve broad, national-level objectives. Students will think in a disciplined, critical, and original manner about the international strategic environment, about a range of potential strategies, and about the strategic effects of joint, interagency, and multinational operations.

      Joint Military Operation

          The Joint Military Operations curriculum focuses on joint war fighting at the theater-strategic and operational levels of war. The JMO course prepares future military and civilian leaders for high-level policy, command, and staff positions requiring joint planning expertise and joint warfighting skills. It emphasizes the theory and practice of operational art in terms of maritime and joint forces. JMO students will learn to apply operational art, the joint operation planning process and critical thinking skills in a seminar environment to employ joint forces to achieve a broad array of objectives. Extensive faculty and student interaction fosters professional attitudes and perspectives essential to successful military operations.

      National Security Decision Making

          The National Security Decision Making curriculum revolves around the effective selection and leadership of military forces with available national resources. The department instructs in the strategic planning and selection of future military forces, and their potential use as a national power tool, the nature of economic, political, organizational, and behavioral factors that affect the selection and command of military forces; and in using expanded critical thinking skills to formulate and execute strategy to achieve desired outcomes within complex national security organizations

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    5. Senior-Level PME/JPME Outcomes

      Senior-Level PME/JPME Outcomes

      -Skilled in Formulating and Executing Strategy & U.S. Policy
      -Skilled in Joint Warfighting, Theater Strategy & Campaign Planning
      -Capable of Strategically-Minded Critical Thinking
      -Capable of Excelling in Positions of Strategic Leadership 

      Intermediate-Level PME Outcomes

      -Skilled in applying OPART to Maritime, Joint, Interagency, & Multinational Warfighting
      -Skilled in Joint/Navy Planning Process
      -Capable of Critical Thought with Operational Perspectives
      -Prepared for Operational Level Leadership Challenges
      -Effective Maritime Spokespersons

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    6. Symposia and Conferences

          The academic life at the Naval War College is enhanced by several conferences and symposia. Some are held annually and some are less frequent.  These programs afford students and faculty opportunities for stimulating encounters with contemporary military, political and cultural leaders from both the professional and academic communities.

      Current Strategy Forum

          The Current Strategy Forum is an academic year capstone event hosted annually by the Secretary of the Navy to discuss current military policy revolving around a pre-determined theme. The Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the Marine Corps appear and provide snapshots of where their respective services are in the area of military operations, and where their services will be going in the near future.  Prominent civilians from leading academic institutions also speak on topics ranging from the global economy to historical patterns. The civilian expertise provides students a new lens through which to view military operations.

      International Sea Power Symposium

          The biennial International Seapower Symposium brings heads of many of the free world’s navies as a catalyst to international understanding. Held during the fall trimester, the Chief of Naval Operations invites the heads of navies invite resident students to join them in the symposium’s plenary sessions. Many of them are graduates of the Naval War College’s Naval Command College or Naval Staff College. 

      Ethics Program

      There are ethics symposia and discussions scheduled throughout the year to focus students and faculty on the professional military ethic.  Each year the ethics program is built around a core theme as well as weaving themes and questions of ethics throughout the core curriculum.  The college invites guest speakers from academic institutions, the military, and other professions to discuss contemporary issues dealing with the professional military ethic. 

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  5. Academic Policy

        The intent of Luce and the War College's thirty-seventh president, Vice Adm. Stansfield Turner constitutes the strategic tradition and purpose of the Naval War College and the driving force of the college's approach to education and research, analysis, and gaming. This strategic tradition is more than rhetoric; it has a very practical and abiding influence in everything the college does. The flag-level, senior-level, intermediate-level, and primary-level professional military education programs designed, developed and delivered by the college are not intended to prepare officers for a specific follow-on assignment, but rather to provide a systematic way to develop leaders and to improve and discipline the way they think. These educational opportunities foster the required mental flexibility and discipline to cope effectively with the intellectual demands inherent in positions of increasingly significant responsibility within the broader national security community in the United States and that of our friends and allies. This intellectual flexibility cannot be obtained solely from a survey course in current international security issues or from a detailed examination of current weapons acquisition and force posture concerns. Instead, intellectual flexibility must flow from a clear understanding of the fundamental principles that have governed our nation's national security concerns during peace and war.

    1. Admission Policy

          Resident military students of the College of Naval Warfare are lieutenant colonels, colonels, commanders, and captains with approximately sixteen to eighteen years of commissioned service, while resident students of the College of Naval Command & Staff are majors or lieutenant commanders with approximately twelve years of commissioned service. In addition, a small number of civilians from selected federal agencies join each class.

          The Naval War College does not directly select its students. The selection is made by each service or agency with the criteria within each service being very similar. In the case of the Navy, candidates for attendance are chosen from officers selected for promotion to lieutenant commander, commander, and captain. This selection is based on professional performance and a clear potential for higher responsibilities. Recent policy allows a selected number of lieutenants to attend the College of Naval Command and Staff. These members will be closely screened by the detailer and must be approved individually by the Naval War College for admission.

          Navy officers in the rank of lieutenant through captain (O-3 through O-6), or other service officers in the grade of O-4 through O-6, may be selected for participation in the College of Distance Education programs. These programs include the Fleet Seminar Program (FSP), the Web-enabled Program, the CDROM-based Program, and the Naval War College at Naval Post Graduate School Program. Admission to the Fleet Seminar Program, Web-enabled Program, and CDROM-based Program requires formal application through the College of Distance Education. Officers are screened and selected based on their academic accomplishments and potential to complete the program.  A minimum of a bachelor’s degree is required. Web-enabled Program students must possess or have ready access to the appropriate computer equipment and the World Wide Web/Internet. The curriculum for these programs is derived from, and closely parallels the accredited resident curricula, and is composed of the same three core courses; Joint Maritime Operations (JMO); National Security Decision Making (NSDM); and Strategy and War (S&W). Additionally, there is a growing list of elective courses available through the College of Distance Education.

          Students enrolled in the Fleet Seminar Program are eligible to apply for the accredited Master's Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies.  Students who complete any part, or all, of either the CDROM-based or Web-enabled Programs are not eligible for the masters degree, and no credit from these programs may be transferred to the M.A. degree.  Prior to submission of an application to the Graduate Degree Program (GDP), a student must have their bachelor's degree transcripts submitted by the granting institution, and must submit two reference letters as part of the GDP application package.  One of the two reference letters must be from a Naval War College faculty member.  The Graduate Degree Program Admissions Board reviews all student GDP applications and recommends worthy candidates for selection to the provost, who then makes the final selections. 

           Attendance to the Maritime Staff Operators Course (MSOC), although open to E-7 to O-6, is primarily targeted toward O3-O5, and E7-E9 personnel en route to billets at numbered fleet and navy-led joint task force headquarters, or joint maritime liaison duty at joint or combined staffs, who do not have recent joint education (e.g., JPME Phase-I) or significant staff experience at the operational level.  Additionally, members from all operational and upper tactical level staffs (CSG, ESG, NECC, etc.) are welcome to attend.  Active duty navy personnel will normally be ordered to attend MSOC en route to their next permanent change of station command in a temporary duty under instruction (TEMDUINS) status.  Commands also have the opportunity to send assigned personnel to MSOC via command temporary duty orders (TDY).  Reserve component personnel may also attend MSOC but must coordinate with their supported command’s operational support officer (OSO) and Commander Naval Reserve Forces training officer (COMNAVRESFOR N7).  Non-navy personnel may be admitted to MSOC on a space available basis.

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    2. Examination and Grading

      U.S. Resident Students   

          All U.S. resident students in the College of Naval Warfare (CNW) and the College of Naval Command and Staff (CNC&S) will be examined and graded in the three trimester studies prescribed by the departments of Joint Military Operations (JMO), National Security Decision Making (NSDM), and Strategy and Policy (S&P). The final academic grade will be derived by equally weighting and averaging numerical results obtained in the three trimesters. In the Electives Program, students will be graded on a High Pass/Pass/Fail basis. Each student must take one elective per trimester from an elective Area of Study that will require an allocation of about 20% of his/her effort, with the balance being directed to the prescribed program. All prescribed, elective and special program requirements must be satisfactorily completed prior to graduation. Exceptions to this policy will be approved only by the dean of academics after administrative review of the particular circumstances involved. Department chairs and the associate dean of academics for Electives and Directed Research are responsible for notifying the dean of academics and the registrar, in writing, immediately upon learning of an incompletion on the part of a student. This notification will include a statement of circumstances and a departmental recommendation. 

      International students

      Naval Command College 

          Senior-level international students in the Naval Command College (NCC) are fully integrated in CNW, attending seminars and lectures with their U.S. counterparts. They complete classes, seminar exercises, and writing assignments in JMO and S&P; international officers complete a team project in NSA.

          International officers may voluntarily take all exams. The faculty evaluates their academic work and provides substantive, written feedback, but does not assign grades to these products. Additionally, the Field Studies Program is designed to give a balanced understanding of the United States culture and institutions as well as American political, social, and economic life.  It also provides an increased awareness of the basic issues of internationally recognized human rights.  International officers are also encouraged to participate in the Electives Program. They receive graduate level credit for courses completed at the Naval War College which can be applied to Masters Degree programs at local Rhode Island universities.

      Naval Staff College

          NSC-10. Intermediate-level international officer students in the ten month NSC course (NSC-10) are fully integrated in CNC&S, attending seminars and lectures alongside their U.S. counterparts. They complete classes and seminar exercises and writing assignments in JMO and S&W; international officers complete a team project rather than individual papers in NSDM. They may voluntarily take exams. The faculty evaluates their academic work and provides substantive, written feedback, but do not assign grades to these products. Additionally, the Field Studies Program, designed to promote understanding of U.S. culture and institutions as well as American political, social, and economic life, is an integral element of their core, educational program.  International officers are highly encouraged to participate in the Electives Program.  

          NSC-6. Intermediate-level international officer students in the six month NSC course (NSC-6) take a separate, condensed, and tailored version of the core CNC&S curriculum. It consists of four major areas of study: S&P, JMO, NSDM, and operational law. They complete classes and seminar exercises and writing assignments in each area of study. They may voluntarily take exams. The faculty evaluates their academic work and provide substantive, written feedback, but do not assign grades to these products. Additionally, the Field Studies Program, designed to promote understanding of U.S. culture and institutions as well as American political, social, and economic life, is an integral element of their core, educational program. They are highly encouraged to participate in the Elective Program for the spring trimester.

      Nonresident Students

      Intermediate-level Program students

           Nonresident students of the College of Distance Education (CDE) must complete specialized versions of the three core courses of Joint Maritime Operations, National Security Decision Making, and Strategy and Warfare that have been modified to meet the constraints of the educational methodology associated with the specific program.  Completion of electives is not required for nonresident students. Nonresident students in the Graduate Degree Program must successfully complete nine credit hours of elective work from the NWC or a regionally-accredited college or university in an elective area of study to be eligible for the master of arts degree.  These elective courses must receive approval of the director, CDE and the associate provost for electives and directed research prior to commencing work. 

      Primary, Basic, and Introductory-level PME Program students

          Students in the Primary, Basic, or Introductory-level PME courses must successfully complete each of the course’s modules in sequence. The courses are designed to take respectively about 75, 40, and 20 hours of online work to complete. The PME courses are provided via Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) Integrated Learning Environment (ILE). The Primary PME course is designed for naval officers in the grade of ensign to lieutenant, navy senior enlisted leaders in the grades of chief or senior chief, and their equivalent DoN civilians. The Basic Course is for E-4 to E-6, and the Introductory for E-1 to E-3.  Upon completion, students’ Electronic Training Jackets are automatically annotated having completed the course.


      Grades

          All of the NWC academic programs have a required, core curriculum, which meets the Navy and Joint PME requirements for its respective level. The prescribed curriculum for resident students in the intermediate and senior-level programs also includes an elective area of study. Students in the nonresident Graduate Degree Program must also complete the elective requirements.

      Senior-level PME with JPME Phase II

          The academic program consists of a core curriculum, consisting of Joint Military Operations, National Security Decision Making, Strategy and Policy, prescribed academic conferences, the Speakers Program, and an elective area of study consisting of three elective courses.

      Intermediate-level PME with JPME Phase I

          For resident and nonresident graduate degree program students, the academic program consists of a core course, including National Security Decision Making, Strategy and Warfare, Joint Maritime Operations, prescribed academic conferences, and an elective area of study consisting of three elective courses. Resident students must also participate in the Speakers Program.  For all other nonresident intermediate-level programs, the core, academic program consists of National Security Decision Making, Strategy and Warfare, Joint Maritime Operations.

      Primary PME with JPME

          The curriculum flow is Introduction, Culture of the Navy, Governance of the Navy, How the Navy Thinks About War, How the Navy Plans its Operations, Technology and Warfare in the Maritime Domain, and the Conclusion. Designed to develop a shared understanding of Navy capabilities for the joint war fight by the Navy’s deck plate-level leaders, the officer and senior enlisted versions share a common, core curriculum, supplemented by some specific focused material.

      Grading

      Except for the elective program, all work in the prescribed curricula for the intermediate and senior-level programs will be graded using the following standards:

      Letter Grade

      Numeric Range

      Numeric Equivalent

      Description

      A+

      97-100

      98

      Very high quality

      A

      94-97

      95

      Clearly above average

      A-

      90-94

      92

      Graduate level

      B+

      87-90

      88

      Expected performance

      B

      84-87

      85

      Of average

      B-

      80-84

      82

      Graduate student

      C+

      77-80

      78

      Below average

      C

      74-77

      75

      Performance expected

      C-

      70-74

      72

      For graduate work

      D+

      67-70

      68

      Well below average

      D

      64-67

      65

      Performance expected

      D-

      60-64

      62

      For graduate work

      F

      0-59

      As assigned

      Unsatisfactory work

         Grades assigned by instructors for papers, examinations, exercises, and  seminar preparation/contribution will be expressed in whole numbers or in letter grades and their numeric equivalent from the scale in paragraph c.(1)(d) above.  Since the grade of F covers a large numeric range, a specific numeric grade between 0 and 59 must be assigned.  Student work that is not completed will receive a numeric grade of zero (0).

          Unexcused tardy student work, that is work turned in past the deadline without previous permission by the instructor, will receive a grade not greater than C+ (78).  Student work determined to be in violation of the honor code will receive a grade of F. The college’s Academic Integrity Board will assign an accompanying numeric grade to the F. Though it may not be applicable to all cases, a grade of zero (0) will be assigned as a matter of practice.  Final course grades will be expressed as the unrounded numerical average, to two decimal places, along with corresponding letter grades with pluses or minuses, as appropriate.

      Expected Grade Distribution

          Historical evidence indicates that a grade distribution of 35%-45% “A’s” and 55%-65% “B’s” and below can be expected from the overall NWC student population. While variations from this norm might occur from seminar to seminar and subject to subject, it would rarely if ever be expected to reach an overall “A” to “B and below ratio of greater than or equal to an even 50/50 distribution.

      Weighting of Course Components

          As a rule, at least 60% of a final course grade must be derived from written work. Within this guideline, department chairs will announce the weights attached to each course component (e.g., exams, essays, papers, seminar preparation/participation, etc.) at the beginning of each trimester. It is the responsibility of both department chairs and individual instructors to ensure that students understand weighting of course components and the grading system at the outset of each course.

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    3. Advanced Research Program

         The Advanced Research Program offers highly qualified students the opportunity to participate in one of several collaborative research groups as well as substitute an in-depth research project for some other segment of the academic program.  Selected students may join an already established research group and at the direction of the group’s faculty mentors, participate in the development research and analysis products of that group.  Alternatively, select students can either develop a topic or chose from a list of pre-approved topics from which a major research paper is completed in place of one of two core courses.

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    4. Degree & Diploma Requirements

      Resident Students

          U.S. resident students in the CNW or CNC&S who earn a final grade of B- or above in each core course (or an approved Advanced Research Program in lieu of one of the core courses), and who pass three elective courses, are awarded the Naval War College Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies and are also eligible for JPME certification (CNW ~ Phase II and CNC&S ~ Phase I).  Resident students from the CNW and the CNC&S who complete the three core courses (or an approved Advanced Research Program in lieu of one of the core courses), with an overall average grade of B- or better and not more than one course grade in the “C” category, and who pass three elective courses are eligible for the NWC diploma and the appropriate JPME certification.

         U.S. resident students in the CNW who have already earned a NWC Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies through prior attendance in the CNC&S or through the CDE Graduate Degree Program will not be eligible to receive a second Master of Arts degree.  Assuming the grade requirements above are met, these students will receive the NWC diploma with JPME II certification.  These students will also earn 30 graduate level semester hours (eight per core course and two per elective each semester) that they may apply towards other graduate programs either concurrently or after completion of the academic year.

      College of Distance Education

          Successful completion of the non-resident, intermediate-level Fleet Seminar Program is recognized by the award of the NWC CNC&S diploma and JPME Phase I certification. Fleet Seminar students, who have been accepted in the Graduate Degree Program and earn a final grade of B- or above in each core course and complete nine graduate semester hours of approved elective courses, are also awarded the Naval War College Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies. Successful completion of other nonresident, intermediate-level programs is recognized by the award of the College of Distance Education diploma and JPME Phase I certification. To earn either the Naval War College CNC&S diploma or the College of Distance Education diploma, a student must complete all three core courses with an overall grade average of “B-” or better and not more than one course grade in the “C” category.  For the JPME Phase I certification and diploma, all the CDE program courses are interchageable, and indeed the FSP courses are accepted for credit for students who may subsequently attend the NWC in residence. 

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    5. Transcripts and Transfer Credit

      Transcripts

          In the case of resident and non-resident students, upon written request to the registrar, an official transcript showing numerical and letter grades will be provided to other educational institutions.

      Transfer Credit

          The policy of the Naval War College is not to accept transfer credit for courses completed at another institution in fulfillment of any portion of the resident NWC curriculum. Transfer credit up to nine hours as required by the Nonresident Graduate Degree Program of the College of Distance Education will be accepted upon the approval of the associate dean of academics for Electives and Directed Research.

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    6. Academic Recognition

          Honors are bestowed as recognition of outstanding academic achievement and as a means to further encourage sound scholarship. This honor, based upon graduation grade point-average, becomes part of the official record, is awarded upon graduation and appears on the transcript, the diploma, military fitness and evaluation reports, and other documents which convey a student’s academic accomplishment. Two categories are awarded for superior scholarship in work leading to the master’s degree. Students whose final grade point average (GPA) stands them numerically within the top 20 % of their graduating cohort—November, March, and June—will be designated as having earned distinction. In determining degrees of distinction within the cohort, students in the top 5 % of their class will be designated on their diploma and transcripts as having graduated with highest distinction, and those comprising the next 15 % will be designated as having graduated with distinction. In no case will a GPA of less than 90 % (A-) earn distinction status.

          Those students participating in tailored curriculum programs, composed of a combination of prescribed courses and special research programs, as approved by the dean of academics, may also be eligible for a distinguished graduate designation.

          When a mathematical distinction between students cannot be made, the proportions stipulated above may be exceeded. Successful completion of the electives program is a prerequisite to eligibility for either of these honors. Fleet seminar students compete for honors in similar fashion as resident students but are compared only within their fleet seminar cohort in making this determination.

          In CDE, Fleet Seminar Program students compete for honors in similar fashion as resident students but are compared within their FSP graduating class in making this determination.  Likewise, NWC at NPS Program students are compared for honors only within their graduating class on the same basis as resident students.  For the Web-enabled and CDROM-based Program students, distinction is determined using as a reference the GPA from the previous year's Fleet Seminar Program June graduating cohort.

          In the case in which students complete graduation requirements through a combination of Residence and Fleet Seminar Program, distinction determination will be based upon the program in which the student is enrolled at the time of completion.  If a student completes graduation requirements through a combination of CDE programs, the determination is based upon the Web-enabled and CDROM-based criteria noted above. 

      Academic Awards

          Many varied and prestigious awards are available for professional writing and research by students, allowing an excellent opportunity for professional recognition. Faculty members provide an important link to ensure that students are made aware of these opportunities and to encourage participation. Department chairs, the director of CDE, and faculty are encouraged to screen papers prepared as an academic requirement and, when warranted, provide constructive criticism and motivation to facilitate student submissions for award competition. The staff judge advocate provides the dean of academic affairs with an ethics review when requested in the case of a special academic award. A short description of awards is given below for faculty reference. Should a faculty member or student have further interest, Naval War College Instruction 1650.16 (series) should be consulted. Faculty members should note that papers entered into competition which are the product of a Naval War College academic requirement may fall into the category of “government works” that are not subject to copyright and may be used by U.S. government agencies as desired. Honorable mention awards or certificates are presented in nearly every category if, in the opinion of the respective award committee, additional essays deserve special recognition. All essays must have been written while the student was enrolled in a Naval War College course, either as a resident or as a nonresident student.

          The Navy League of the United States annually sponsors awards to the two maritime service students graduating in June who demonstrate a high degree of academic, extracurricular, and community service. The award presented to the student of the College of Naval Warfare is known as the Stephen Bleecker Luce Award; that presented to the student of the College of Naval Command and Staff is known as the William Sowden Sims Award.

          The President’s Award for CNW and CNC&S Honor Graduates in the March and November classes is presented at the respective graduation ceremony to those students who demonstrate a high degree of academic, extracurricular, and community service.

          The Admiral Richard G. Colbert Memorial Prize is a cash prize ($1,000) and certificate awarded annually by the Naval War College Foundation to the author of the best professional essay that focuses on an economic, military, political, strategic, or tactical aspect of an appropriate professional topic.

          The J. William Middendorf II Award for Student Research is awarded annually to a student or group of students whose research project is considered to have made the most significant contribution in a field related to strategic or tactical concepts, logistics, or readiness. Recipients receive a certificate and a $1,000 prize.

          The Naval War College Foundation Award recognizes the student whose essay is considered to have made the most significant contribution to some aspect of maritime strategy or the operational level of warfare. A certificate and a $1,000 cash prize are presented.

          The B. Franklin Reinauer II Defense Economics Prize is given for the essay considered to have made the most significant contribution to understanding of the relationship between national security and economics. The recipient receives a certificate and a $1,000 cash prize.

          The Jerome E. Levy Economic Geography and World Order Prize recognizes the best research product that fundamentally addresses and proposes potential solutions in the disciplines of economic geography and national/international security.

          The Michael Handel Strategy Prize Essay Award is awarded to a student who writes an original essay for the final examination in the resident intermediate- and senior-level Strategy and Policy Course. This essay must exhibit qualities that Professor Handel especially prized in strategic analysis: it will be well-written; it will systematically examine a difficult, recurring strategic question that derives insights from both history and strategic theory; and it will reflect a true dispassionate analysis of the issue. The Strategy and Policy faculty will nominate exceptional examination essays for consideration by the prize committee.

          The Vice Admiral James H. Doyle, Jr., Military Operations and International Law Prize recognizes the essay considered to have made the most significant contribution on the role of international law in military operations during peacetime or armed conflict. Sponsored by the Naval War College Foundation, the award consists of a $500 cash prize and an inscribed certificate for one U.S. and one international officer.

          The annual Marine Corps Association Award is presented for the best professional essay on topics relating to the Marine Corps or Marine Corps operations. The $500 cash award, provided by the Marine Corps Association, and a certificate are presented.

          The Director of Naval Intelligence (DNI) and the Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), respectively, sponsor Intelligence Directors’ Essay Awards for the best professionally worthy essays on some aspect of naval or maritime intelligence and joint or national intelligence. The awards consist of Office of Naval Intelligence and Defense Intelligence Agency plaques.

          The Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Award (AFCEA) recognizes the best professional essay in the areas of Avionics, Command and Control, Computers, Communications, Electronic Warfare, Electronics, Radar, Satellites, and Intelligence Systems. Operations research papers or other student submissions developing these subjects are considered for the competition. Recipients of the award receive a certificate describing the accomplishment and a table clock.

          International students attending the Naval Command College are eligible to compete for the Robert E. Batemans International Prize Essay Award sponsored by the Naval War College Foundation. The essay must represent original thinking on some aspect of force planning, or current operational or strategic issues of maritime interest with an international dimension. The award consists of a $1,000 cash prize and an inscribed certificate.

          The annual Zimmerman/Gray International Essay Award, established in academic year 2004–2005, is given for the best of the professionally worthy papers submitted by a student in the Naval Staff College full-year course of study. The award consists of a perpetual plaque displayed at the Naval War College bearing the winner’s name. Recipients of the award are also given a suitably inscribed certificate describing their accomplishment and a cash prize provided through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Gilson Gray and the Naval War College Foundation. The award is named in honor of their fathers, CDR Donald Zimmerman, USN, and CDR Gilson B. Gray, Jr., USN, both career naval aviators who saw combat duty during World War II.

          The Captain Walter B. Woodson, Jr., USN, Academic Memorial Prize was established in memory of the individual who served as the Executive Director of the Naval War College Foundation from 1973 to 1993. It is awarded to a Naval Staff College student for the best paper on a topic relating to force planning or strategic issues of maritime interest. Sponsored by the Naval War College Foundation through the generosity of Captain Woodson’s many friends, the prize—a ship’s clock and barometer—is presented at the graduation ceremonies in June and December.

          The Naval Submarine League Prize recognizes the best essay or research paper submitted related to submarine warfare by a resident student at the Naval War College.

          The Naval War College Review Prizes are sponsored by the Naval War College Foundation for works published in the Naval War College Review. The three best feature articles appearing in the Review during a calendar year are awarded cash prizes. Historically oriented feature articles of maritime interest may also be considered for the Edward S. Miller History Prize. Authors may, but need not, have an affiliation with the Naval War College.

          Each year the Naval War College Foundation sponsors a monetary award to an outstanding College of Distance Education Fleet Seminar Program graduate demonstrating high standards of academic performance, professionalism, and community service. This award is known as the McGinnis Family Award for Outstanding Performance in Fleet Seminar Education.

          The Foundation also presents the Vice Admiral John T. Hayward Award for Outstanding Performance in Correspondence Education to a graduate of the College of Distance Education Web-enabled Program, or the CDROM-based Program who displays the highest overall standard of academic performance during his/her enrollment. The final course must have been completed prior to 1 June of the year the award is presented. Each award consists of a $1,000 cash prize and a plaque or certificate.

          Annually the Naval War College presents the Vice Admiral Charles “Soc” McMorris Award to the top graduate of the Maritime Advanced Warfighting School, based on grade point average, faculty evaluation, and peer recommendations. The award is presented at MAWS graduation in September.

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    7. Academic Honor Code

          The Naval War College diligently enforces a strict academic code requiring students to credit properly the source of materials directly cited in any written work submitted in fulfillment of diploma/degree requirements. Simply put: plagiarism is prohibited. Likewise, this academic code prohibits cheating and the misrepresentation of a paper as a student’s original thought. Plagiarism, cheating, and misrepresentation are inconsistent with the professional standards required of all military personnel and government employees.

          Furthermore, in the case of U.S. military officers, such conduct clearly violates the “Exemplary Conduct Standards” delineated in Title 10, U.S. Code, Sections 3583 (U.S. Army), 5947 (U.S. Naval Service), and 8583 (U.S. Air Force).

          If written work is submitted which appears to violate the Academic Honor Code, the faculty or staff member will notify the executive assistant of the department concerned or the director, College of Distance Education as appropriate. The department will investigate the matter to determine whether or not there is substantial evidence of a violation. If there is substantial evidence, the chair of the department or the director, College of Distance Education will refer the matter to the dean of academic affairs.

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  6. Academic Departments and Courses

        The Naval War College maintains three academic departments: Strategy and Policy, National Security Decision Making, and Joint Military Operations.  The Strategy and Policy department is designed to teach students strategic thinking, National Security Decision Making is designed to teach students about effective leadership and decision making, and Joint Military Operations is designed to teach joint war fighting at the theater-strategic and operational levels. 

        The college also offers elective courses and two-week courses to reserve officers.

    1. Strategy and Policy

          Strategy and Policy (S&P) teaches students to think strategically. Students examine the relationship between a nation’s political interests and goals on the one hand, and the way military force has been and may be used to pursue those goals on the other. The object is to learn and practice a process of critical strategic analysis. Major strategic thinkers, fundamental analytic categories, and recurring strategic themes are applied to historical cases and considered in light of present and prospective events. Analysis stresses that the strategic connection between political purpose and military means is an interactive process; that political goals must, if war is used, be matched by an adequate and appropriate strategy; that this involves assessment of the international security environment and one’s own and one’s adversaries domestic will and military capacity; that civil-military relations must be kept carefully coordinated; that coalitions and alliances have costs as well as benefits; and that war termination considerations must continuously accompany both policy and strategy.

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    2. National Security Affairs (NSA)

      The National Security Affairs (NSA) Department teaches two primary core courses that engage the complexities of the contemporary and emerging national security environment. The National Security Decision Making (NSDM) course is designed for senior military officers and U.S. Government civilians and offers a broad security studies curriculum that focuses on the national strategic level. The Theater Security Decision Making (TSDM) course is designed for intermediate military officers and U.S. Government civilians and also offers a general security studies curriculum,  but focuses heavily on the theater strategic level (with particular emphasis on the role and challenges of the U.S. geographic combatant commands). Both courses approach the study of national security affairs at three levels of analysis through distinctive sub-courses in Security Strategies, Policy Analysis, and Leadership Concepts, and a culminating exercise in which students bring these levels of analysis together. Common areas of study include the effective selection and leadership of military forces in the context of constrained national resources, strategic planning and selection of future military forces and their potential use as a national power tool, the nature of economic, political, organizational, and behavioral factors that affect the decision making process within complex national security organizations, and the challenges associated with leadership beyond the tactical and operational levels.

       National Security Decision Making (NSDM) educates military officers and U.S. government civilians in effective decision making and leadership on security issues, particularly those involving force selection and planning challenges, within national resource constraints. In support of this objective, the department provides instruction in: the strategic planning and selection of future military forces and their potential use as a tool of national power; the nature of economic, political, organizational, and behavioral factors affecting selection and command of military forces, and in using expanded critical thinking skills to formulate and execute strategy to achieve desired outcomes within complex national security organizations. The course philosophy reflects the belief that effective, senior-level executives must synthesize many academic disciplines and professional experience into a comprehensive decision making and implementation strategy. Accordingly, the department uses an interdisciplinary approach incorporating concepts from economics, political science, strategy, leadership, psychology, and other related disciplines. In an active seminar environment, students apply these concepts to the most critical problems now facing national security planners. The senior course curriculum consists of three sub-courses and one culminating exercise: (1) Strategy, Security, and Forces, (2) Policy Making and Process, (3) the Senior Leadership Seminar and (4) the NSDM Final Exercise. The intermediate course curriculum consists of three sub-courses and one culminating exercise: (1) Strategy and Theater Security, (2) Leading Organizations Effectively, (3) National Security Policy Analysis and (4) NSDM Final Exercise.

      The NSDM's intermediate resident course is taught from the perspective of five regional combatant commanders.  Students are assigned to a seminar that will focus on one of these five regions. Assignment to specific regions will be based on a preference sheet submitted by students and on a student's past or likely future assignment to a particular region.  Students are requested to submit their regional preference sheet well in advance of the start of the NSDM trimester. 

      1. National Security Decision Making (NSDM)

            The National Security Decision Making (NSDM) course educates senior military officers and U.S. government civilians in the College of Naval Warfare and Naval Command College on effective decision making and leadership on national security issues, focusing primarily at the strategic level. Focus areas include strategic planning and selection of future military forces and their potential use as one tool of national power; the nature of economic, political, organizational, and behavioral factors affecting national security decisions within complex national security organizations, with particular emphasis on the Department of Defense and its role in the interagency process; enhancing strategic thinking skills and understanding of the role, formulation, and implementation of U.S. national security strategies; and exploring the unique challenges that characterize leadership at the strategic level. The course philosophy reflects the belief that effective strategic leaders must synthesize many academic disciplines and professional experiences. The course therefore approaches national security studies from three distinct levels of analysis, utilizing an interdisciplinary approach incorporating concepts from economics, political science, strategy, leadership, psychology, and cognate disciplines. In an active learning seminar environment, students apply concepts from these disciplines to case studies that encompass a spectrum of complex national security challenges. The NSDM curriculum consists of three sub-courses and one culminating exercise: (1) Security Strategies, (2) Policy Analysis, (3) Leadership Concepts, and (4) the NSDM Final Exercise (FX).

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      2. Theater Security Decision Making (TSDM)

            The Theater Security Decision Making (TSDM) course educates intermediate military officers and U.S. government civilians in the College of Naval Command and Staff and Naval Staff College on effective decision making and leadership on security issues, focusing primarily at the theater strategic level. Focus areas include enhancing cultural awareness and regional expertise; development of theater strategies and understanding associated requirements by the geographic combatant commands; preparation of officers and civilians for intermediate-level command and staff assignments; the nature of economic, political, organizational, and behavioral factors affecting national security decisions within complex national security organizations, with particular emphasis on the combatant commands and their role within the Department of Defense; enhancing critical thinking skills and understanding of the role, formulation, and implementation of theater strategies within the context of broader U.S. national security strategies; and, the characteristics and skills needed to be an effective participant in a senior staff environment.

            The course philosophy reflects the belief that effective command and staff leaders must synthesize many academic disciplines and professional experiences. The course therefore approaches national security studies from three distinct levels of analysis, utilizing an interdisciplinary approach incorporating concepts from economics, political science, strategy, leadership, psychology, and cognate disciplines. In an active learning seminar environment, students apply concepts from these disciplines to case studies that encompass a spectrum of complex national security challenges. Each seminar will concentrate on a specific geographic combatant command. Assignments to these regionally-oriented seminars is based on a preference sheet submitted by students and on assessment of past or likely future assignments to a particular region.

            Students are requested to submit their regional preference sheet well in advance of the start of the TSDM trimester. The TSDM curriculum consists of three sub-courses and one culminating exercise: (1) Security Strategies, (2) Policy Analysis, (3) Leadership Concepts, and (4) the TSDM Final Exercise (FX).

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    3. Joint Military Operations

         The Joint Military Operations (JMO) Department teaches the Joint Maritime Operations Course to students in the College of Naval Command and Staff and the Naval Staff College, and teaches the Joint Military Operations Course to students in the College of Naval Warfare and the Naval Command College. The curriculum for each course is based on the enduring principles that historically govern military operations, updated to the current world situation and stemming from the extant National Security and National Military Strategies.

          The College of Naval Warfare JMO course emphasizes the issues that must be addressed by a regional, war fighting combatant commander, other supporting combatant commanders, subordinate component commanders, and their staffs. The College of Naval Command and Staff JMO course addresses operations of the joint task force commander, subordinate commanders, and supporting staffs. Both courses seek to instill an entirely new student perspective.

          The entering student’s primary background experience generally is centered in a single, discrete discipline within the narrow dimension of a segment of a single-Service environment. The graduating student, on the other hand, has a firm grasp of military and naval strategy and campaigning, including integrated operations with other Services and U.S. agencies, and multinational operations with allies. Graduates also understand the linkages among strategy, operations, and tactics, and possess a thorough grounding in the essential elements of military planning and decision making.

         The JMO courses employ a multidisciplinary approach, which synthesizes selected concepts from strategy, military decision making to include international law and rules of engagement, operational planning, and warfare tasks. Directly affiliated with JMO, the Maritime Advanced Warfighting School (MAWS) is a CNO-directed, 13-month course of instruction designed to impart significant naval and joint planning knowledge to specially selected Navy and other-Service officers for subsequent assignments to Numbered Fleet, Navy Component Fleet Commander, Joint Component, and Combatant Commander staffs.

         MAWS students participate in the College of Naval Command and Staff core curriculum, but take a planner-tailored JMO course and three electives comprising the Operational Planning Area of Study. During the final three months of their studies, MAWS students conduct operational planning to address real-world problems assigned by U.S. theater-strategic and operational commanders, thus honing the planning and analytical skills acquired during the year.

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    4. Operational Level Programs

          Operational Level Programs, by program or on request, provides education, training, and assistance on maritime operations for current and future fleet commanders and their staffs in order to more effectively and efficiently employ naval, joint, and combined forces at the operational level of war. 

      Responsibilities of the Operational Level Programs Department include:

      a.  Establish and maintain Flag, Officer, and Enlisted development programs to serve effectively as Maritime Component Commanders or as staff  members at Fleet Headquarters. 

      b.  Primary responsibility is oversight and management of Operational Level Programs (OLP)  which includes the C/JFMCC Flag Officer Course, Maritime Staff Operators Course (MSOC), the Assist and Assess Team (AAT), and other activities within the Naval War College that involve maritime operational level command and control (C2) as it directly relates to the Fleet, as well as direct support to the fleet  in maritime operational level C2 training and assistance.  These programs shall: 

                1)  Address the practical challenges confronting commanders and staffs at the operational level of war in the maritime domain. 

                2)   Serve as both a foundation and a catalyst for Navy cultural adjustments to accelerate the evolution of JFMCC concepts and capabilities. 

                3)  Develop perspectives necessary for these officers to gain a high degree of confidence with concepts, systems, language and processes to effectively employ naval forces in a joint, interagency and multinational environment. 

                4)  Assign and task personnel, organize and resource programs and maintain facilities to ensure they serve as a resource of maritime operational level C2 expertise for the Navy. 

      c.  Coordinate and oversee various NWC functions in the successful execution of courses and fleet support. These functions include but are not limited to Special Events, Publications & Printing, Public Affairs coordination, War Gaming and Joint Military Operations Department’s, The Maritime Advanced Warfare School (MAWS), Graphics, Comptroller and the Staff Judge Advocate. 

                1)  Coordinate administrative scheduling and functional activities. 

                2)  Allocate military and civilian assignments within the Department. 

                3)  Direct the maintenance of supply and fiscal accounts. 

                4)  Ensure classified material control procedures are followed. 

                5)  Coordinate space allocation of Evans Hall for the execution of tenant activity events. 

      6)  Direct an effective training program for staff officers, enlisted and civilian personnel. 

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    5. Electives Program

          The Naval War College Electives Program constitutes 20% of the Naval War College resident academic curriculum. The purpose of the Electives Program is to expand treatment of subjects offered in the core curriculum, offer subjects not available in the core curriculum, and provide specialized Areas of Study (AOS) that produce special competencies that can be identified and tracked by the Navy’s personnel system.  These AOS are intended, according to the CNO, to complement the Executive Learning Officer’s initiatives.  Accordingly, Navy students and DoN civilian students will take only the electives offered as part of their chosen AOS. Navy students who complete three electives within a course of study will, in some cases, receive an Additional Qualification Designator (AQD), or the equivalent, as appropriate. Elective courses may be selected according to the students’ personal interests and professional preferences without risk to academic standing. The Naval War College encourages faculty and staff to offer electives in their various specialties.

      AREAS OF STUDY (AOS)
      Series of three courses in a particular  area of study (AOS)
      (90 hours of class work)

      Regional and Cultural Proficiency – Achieves CJCS RE Level 3
      •     Asia-Pacific
      •     Greater Middle East
      •     Africa
      •     Latin America/WESTHEM
      •     EURASIA

      -Executive Analysis for the Warfare Commander
      -Corporate Strategic Planning
      -Operational Law
      -Strategy, Operations, & Military History
      -Information Operations, Command & Control, and Battle Space Awareness
      -Insurgency & Terrorism
      -Leadership & Ethics
      -Homeland Security Homeland Defense
      -Enterprise Strategic Planning
      -Strategic Theater Planner
      -Operational Logistics

      AREAS OF STUDY (AOS)
      Series of three courses in a particular  area of study (AOS)
      (More than 90 hours of class work)

      -Joint Operational Planning (MAWS)
      -Halsey Group
      -Mahan Scholars
      -Stockdale Group
      -Joint Land Aerospace Sea Simulation (JLASS)

      AOS REQUIREMENT

      -Directed by CNOG 05
      -Most produce an AQD (Additional Qualification Designator) for US Navy Students

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    6. Special Research Programs

          The Naval War College offers several special programs that provide resident students opportunities to conduct advanced research at the college. These programs provide enhanced educational experiences for select students; they encourage innovative and critical thinking, contribute to the professional military and national security literature, support high-level military decision making; and have practical value in the area of building trust and confidence and leadership.  The Special Research Programs fall into two general categories: Advanced Research Groups and Individual Research Projects. 

      Advanced Research Program (ARP) Groups

          As of January 2011, there are four Advanced Research Groups established within the Center for Naval Warfare Studies under the responsibility of the Warfare Analysis and Research Department. Each of these groups provides an opportunity for a small group of specially selected students to pursue collaborative research projects on operational and strategic issues of current interest to the senior leadership of the Navy and the Department of Defense.  The primary focus of each of the four Advanced Research Groups is:

      Halsey Alfa:  Examines enduring warfare imbalances of high-intensity conventional warfare in maritime area denial situations.  This group uses iterative, ongoing wargaming and operational analysis as their primary methodologies.

      Halsey Bravo: Examines medium-intensity, asymmetric and anti-access challenges.  This group also uses iterative, ongoing wargaming and operational analysis as their primary methodologies.

      The Stockdale Group was established in 2006 to foster innovative thinking on operational level leadership and conduct research, analysis and gaming to determine a set of leadership competencies required of 21st century leaders, while providing an enhanced educational experience for a select group of officers attending the senior-level course.  It consists of a linked program of course work in the core and elective curricula, as well as group research projects.  The program culminates in a presentation of the research project to the CNO just prior to the June graduation.  This program is the only advanced research project to include international students, and it is not open to students starting/graduating in March.

      Gravely Group: Students in this group pursue individual research projects into Integrated Air and Missile Defense and Undersea Warfare, based on current and future operational requirements and adding to the overall body of knowledge in these mission areas. 

      Mahan Scholars Program: Students participate in individual and collaborative research projects on an issue of strategic relevance to the U.S. Navy and its role in joint warfare.  It consists of a linked program of course work in the core and elective curriculums, as well as a group research effort begun in the fall trimester and completed during the spring trimester.  

      Individual Advanced Research Projects

          The Individual ARPs allows qualified students to undertake individual research projects that substitute for single core courses. These projects, comparable to master’s research project, are subject to review and approval by the Advanced Research Council (ARC) and the President of the College. They are supervised by faculty advisors with expertise in the areas studied. Faculty members, including the faculty advisor chosen to guide the student’s research and the director of the program, evaluate each ARP proposal and final product.  Nominally, individual research projects are proposed in the student’s first trimester at the college with preliminary research done in the second trimester.  The student’s final trimester is then used to complete the research and produce the written product.  The most successfully students in this program have some level of experience in research methodology and in writing thesis length papers.

          For both the Group and Individual ARPs, ARP students participate in their respective research group as an elective for two trimesters. During one trimester, ARP students participate full time in their research group or in completing their individual projects in place of either the Strategy and Policy or National Security Decision Making core courses.  Students receive a numerical grade for their participation in the ARP that becomes part of their transcript at the college, contributes to their class standing and is credited to their matriculation to the Master’s Degree and JPME requirements.

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    7. Regional & Specialized Study Groups

          The Naval War College hires faculty members with regional security expertise and analysis in all areas of the globe.  Academic, research, and gaming faculty members possessing regional and cultural knowledge participate in NWC’s regional studies groups, through which NWC promotes major research and exchange/educational relationships with counterpart institutions around the world.  The College’s five regional studies groups have become strategic assets in the Global War on Terrorism and in future military operations; they have also helped to support the CNO's maritime security cooperation initiatives.  Students are invited to participate as their schedule permits during their academic year.

          Faculty from these regional studies groups teach regionally oriented electives and research issues of crucial importance to the numbered Fleets, combatant commanders and other government agencies. 

      Asia Pacific Studies Group
          The Asia-Pacific Studies Group (APSG) consists of faculty and students at the College with particular interest, expertise, or experience on China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Russia, Southeast Asia, Australia, regional maritime affairs, and US military strategy in the Asia-Pacific region.    The group serves as the focal point within the College for information sharing related to major policy developments within the region and to US policy.  The APSG convenes periodic seminars where members report on research in progress; it also invites and hosts speakers from outside the College.  In addition, the group sponsors the Asia-Pacific Forum, an annual conference where prominent specialists from the US and the Asia-Pacific region, government officials, and serving officers deliberate critical strategy and policy issues, with research results then published in major volumes.  The APSG also performs an important outreach function for the College, facilitating the participation of various faculty members in major conferences and research activities in the Asia-Pacific region and in the United States.  In addition, the College conducts regular exchanges with the Japan Maritime Staff College, its counterpart institution in Japan; it also undertakes periodic interactions with other military colleges across the region and with major research organizations devoted to Asia and the Pacific.   The group also performs a coordinating function with the Electives Program on the growing array of course offerings on the countries of the region and on US Asia-Pacific strategy, enabling students to fulfill requirements for the College’s Asia-Pacific Studies Concentration. 

      EURASIA Studies Group
          The EURASIA Studies Group (ESG) comprises faculty and students with an interest in Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Western/Central Asia affairs including Russia.  While addressing issues internal to those geopolitical areas, the ESG focuses on issues of transatlantic interest in the political, economic and security spheres.  The purpose of the ESG is stimulate the exchange of applied learning and knowledge, bringing educational value to the Naval War College, its faculty and its students, and supplying strategic and operational thought to topics of relevance to the Navy and the Joint Force through academic research and engagement.

          To accomplish this, the ESG program uses subject matter experts, guest speakers, and colloquia capable of addressing economic, political and security issues related to EURASIA institutions, governments, trends and processes.  A primary focus of the group has been on establishing and developing at the Naval War College a curriculum of elective courses focusing on EURASIA. 

      Greater Middle East and South Asia Studies Group
          The Greater Middle East and South Asia Studies Group is comprised of regional experts and other faculty whose collective academic research interests, operational experience, and professional careers focus on the most important strategic challenges within this region.  The group advances the NWC educational mission through its dedication to three key areas: teaching, research, and international engagement.  The GMESASG is linked to the college’s Greater Middle East Area of Study (AOS) which seeks to ensure our resident mid-grade and senior military officers a robust and cutting-edge elective curriculum through classroom instruction, independent research, and opportunities for engagement with the region.  The group also facilitates conferences, lectures, and workshops throughout the year that link our faculty and students with other communities of scholars and professionals outside the college in both government agencies and academic institutions.   In recent years, the GMESASG was instrumental in providing the framework for a Distinguished Visiting Scholar Program which hosted three well-known scholars on Middle East and South Asian affairs:  Shibley Telhami, University of Maryland (2006-7); Vali Nasr, Fletcher School of Diplomacy (2007-8); and Barnett Rubin, New York University (2008-9).  In 2009, the GMESASG organized a conference titled “Arab Media in the Global Information Market.”  The GMESASG contributes to several ongoing college initiatives such as the Flag Leadership Program, the Cultural Awareness and Regional Expertise Program for the Surface Warfare School, and many individual faculty members are instrumental to supporting and providing expertise to the war gaming department and to Halsey Bravo.  The GMESASG seeks to integrate the professional and intellectual capital of its affiliated faculty with the college’s larger mission through curricular excellence, programmatic relevance, and community and international outreach on the critical region and nations of the Greater Middle East and South Asia.

      Latin America Studies Group
          The Latin American Studies Group, comprised of faculty, staff and students with an interest in the region, coordinates the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of an extensive engagement program throughout the Latin American region.  This engagement program supports theater security cooperation activities of the U.S. Southern Command, U.S. Northern Command, their naval components, and the U.S. Navy.  

          The study group supports a variety of: conferences; war games; research projects; faculty travel to conduct lectures, workshops, and curriculum reviews; and war college and faculty visits from the region to the Naval War College.  The bi-annual Conference of the Naval War Colleges of the Americas provides for an exchange of ideas of war colleges' leadership in directing education, research and strategic and operational studies.  An Inter-American War Game includes 14 countries from the hemisphere.  A Hexalateral War Game includes Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Peru and the United States.  Several major Southern Command conferences on professional military education, held in Latin America, have been organized and executed by Naval War College faculty teams. 

          Latin America Studies Group faculty also prepare and deliver lectures and short courses delivered at naval war colleges, defense staffs, think tanks, and civilian universities.  A recent innovation is collaborative sharing and review of respective curriculums which have recently been completed with Chile, Mexico, Peru and Jamaica.  The knowledge and regional understanding gained is brought back and incorporated into the college's core curriculum, electives, and research programs.  Faculty members teach the three electives in the Western Hemisphere - Latin American Concentration.

      Africa Studies Group
          The Africa Studies Group (ASG) comprises faculty and students with an interest in African affairs.  It invites occasional guest speakers, disseminates information about local events relating to Africa, and circulates electronic articles of likely interest to members.  The group has worked with Commander, US Naval Forces Europe, in developing and implementing plans to engage with professional military institutions in the Gulf of Guinea region, and members are involved in a similar initiative for Nigeria, Kenya and South Africa led by the Africa Center for Strategic Studies at National Defense University.  However, the primary focus of the group has been on establishing and developing at NWC a curriculum of elective courses focusing on Africa.  Using resident faculty and adjuncts from private institutions, this program has grown to four courses, with a fifth planned.  The College of Distance Education is currently working on online versions of these courses that will make them accessible to officers of all services on a global basis.

      Indian Ocean Studies Group
          The Indian Oceans Studies Group is the College’s newest regionally focused group.  It comprises faculty and students with an interest in affairs between nations bordering the Indian Ocean.  It invites occasional guest speakers, disseminates information about local events relating to the Indian Ocean region, and circulates electronic articles of likely interest to members.  Involved faculty members have been asked to advise key senior military leaders.

      Center on Irregular Warfare and Armed Groups (CIWAG)
          CIWAG was created in 2008 using grants from private philanthropic foundations to ensure that education and research on armed groups remains timely and easily accessible. CIWAG is supported by bridging funds from Naval Special Warfare. The center’s mission is three-fold: promote and support research and teaching on irregular warfare and armed groups; disseminate cutting-edge analysis via symposia and workshops to provide a forum for dialogue at the Naval War College between US and international practitioners and scholars; and expand outreach and networking activities to establish and sustain a “community of interest” devoted to the study and teaching of irregular warfare and armed groups. CIWAG is developing a series of case studies from noted scholars from around the world to provide students from professional military educational institutions and civilian universities with strategic insights into contemporary and historical conflicts. CIWAG was founded and is co-directed by Dr. Marc Genest and Dr. Andrea Dew with Deputy Director CAPT Thomas Sass. It has 12 senior associates who are Naval War College Strategy and Policy faculty members and four research associates. CIWAG held its third annual symposium at the College this summer: "Irregular Warfare and Armed Groups: Minimizing Threats and Maximizing Opportunities."

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    8. Reserve Component JPME I Courses

          The Naval War College (NWC) currently administers two Reserve Component (RC) JPME I syllabus programs each calendar year.  The National Security and Decision Making course is normally held in the Spring while the Strategy and War course is normally held in the Fall.  These courses are based upon the NWC College of Distance Education (CDE) JPME I syllabus and once completed may be applied as partial credit toward a Naval War College JPME I certificate by enrolling in the NWC CDE Web-enabled or CDROM-based Programs.  The courses do involve substantial pre-course preparation and are administered by the same NWC Faculty members who teach the In-Residence programs.  Funding can be obtained either through your parent command or Commander, Navy Reserve Forces Command, N7-Training.  Further information on these courses can be obtained by contacting the NWC Operational Support Office (401 841 4068)

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  7. College of Distance Education

        The College of Distance Education (CDE) provides Naval War College education programs to Naval officers, other service officers, and selected federal civilian employees who cannot attend the NWC in residence. The College pioneered non-resident military education in 1914 to directly connect it with officers in the fleet. The College delivers group and individual programs that met the standards for programmatic reaccreditation by the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff for JPME Phase I during 2009.

        The non-resident intermediate-level student population has grown considerably over the last few years to its present number of nearly 5,000. The College now offers four tailored programs to meet JPME-I requirements and the circumstances of its non-resident students.

        The progress reflects the College’s efforts to assist the CNO in educating future leaders, and it also fulfills statutory requirements for JPME Phase I. The success of the resident curriculum carries over to these directly-derived non-resident programs. The CDE faculty is closely involved with its resident academic department colleagues in curricula development, and most importantly, they provide the expertise required to adapt the resident curricula to the various distance education methodologies.

         The Director of CDE and the academic department Chairs mutually consent to the intermediate-level curricula of the various distance education programs, which are approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs. The bond between the core resident faculty and the distance education faculty has strengthened significantly as they work to ensure similarity and compatibility in curricular content and administrative procedures.  Selected CDE Newport faculty teach every year in the resident core curricula, and nearly the entire full-time Newport CDE faculty has taught in the resident programs in the past.  Additionally, the resident faculty participates in the College’s Fleet Seminar Program Additional Instruction Location  Assessment Program, further ensuring the educational effectiveness and the the congruence of the resident and non-resident intermediate-level programs.

    1. Fleet Seminar Program

          The Fleet Seminar Program (FSP) delivers a seminar-based curricula taught by adjunct and on-campus faculty members to about 1,200 students annually at Naval bases and stations across the United States. Students attend thirty-four weekly evening seminars annually to complete each course, typically taking three years to complete the program.  Applications for admission are open from April through June of each year, with classes formed in August for an early September start.

           Seminars are offered at the following locations: Newport, RI; Annapolis, MD; Washington DC; Patuxent River, MD; Fort Meade, MD; Norfolk, VA; Dahlgren, VA; Great Lakes, IL; Millington, TN; Mayport, FL; Jacksonville, FL; Pensacola, FL; New Orleans, LA; Dallas/Fort Worth, TX; San Diego, CA; Port Hueneme, CA; Whidbey Island, WA; Everett, WA; Bangor, WA; and Pearl Harbor, HI.

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    2. Graduate Degree Program

          As a special adjunct to the Fleet Seminar Program, students may apply separately for the Graduate Degree Program (GDP) after successful completion on their first FSP core course.  The GDP leads to the award of the NWC Master of Arts degree, and requires the completion of the three FSP core courses with a minimum B- grade, and the completion of nine credits of elective course work in an approved Area of Study.  

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    3. Web-Enabled Correspondence Program

          The Web-Enabled Correspondence Program delivers a tailored curriculum taught by CDE faculty to cohorts of about twenty students on the World-Wide Web. The Web-enabled Program is an 18 month, paced program with scheduled interaction between the students and the instructor, and between the students themselves singly or in groups.  The three individual courses require about 6-8 hours of work each week, and the requirement to keep pace with the instructor and classmates results in a very high course completion rate.  The time required actually "online" is minimal, and all online work is asynchronous, that is, not at the same time in a "chat room" mode.  Additionally, there is never a set time that students must be online, so students and professors may be physically located around the world. 

      Web Class Cohorts:

      S&W is 17 weeks long and starts quarterly in January, April, July and October.
      NSA is 24 weeks long and starts quarterly in February, May, August, and November.
      JMO is 35 weeks long and starts quarterly in February, May, August, and November. 

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    4. CD-ROM Based Correspondence Program

          The CDROM-based Program is available on a controlled basis to a limited number of students, typically those active duty officers stationed at sea or in remote locations with limited or no internet access.  The methodology of this program allows eligible students to complete an independent-study, distance program supervised by CDE faculty.  Faculty and student interaction is primarily by email supplemented by paper or phone correspondence when necessary.  Individual study precedes evaluated assignments.  The curriculum and assessments are designed to be completed in 12-14 months at a pace of 4-6 hours of study per week.

          Internet access is not required.  The intent of the CDROM-based Program is to leverage technology by using a number of audio and video enhancements to supplement the required readings in each course.  Video lectures by resident faculty are recorded and embedded on the media.  There are also a number of interactive student activities, self-assessment quizzes, and graphics to provide a more engaging learning environment.  In addition to regular curriculum updates on each of the courses, most of the media have been updated to DVD, and several software improvements have been implemented to improve the user interface. 

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    5. Naval War College at the Naval Postgraduate School

      Naval War College-Naval Postgraduate School Partnership for Joint Professional Military Education 

          The Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) tasked NWC to assume responsibility for the JPME I program at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey in 1999. Starting in the Academic Year 1999-2000, the NWC entered a partnership with NPS and offered the NWC core courses to eligible personnel at NPS as electives in their programs of studies.  In addition, the S&W course fulfills a Secretary of the Navy requirement for all Department of the Navy personnel attending NPS in residence to complete a maritime strategy course.   

          The core NWC courses are taught in a seminar format in the classroom on the NPS quarterly schedule.  Both S&W and NSA are taught in a quarter each, while JMO is split into two courses, each comprising one quarter in length.  The courses need not be taken in sequence over four consecutive quarters, but may be spread-out over the time a student is assigned to NPS.  The only caveat to this feature is that JMO I must be completed before JMO II. Other service officers at NPS are also eligible to attend the courses for their JPME I certification thus adding important joint acculturation to the program.  On average, nearly 400 students a quarter enroll in the NWC-at-NPS courses, and about the same number graduate each year, thus earning the CDE Command and Staff Intermediate-Level Service College diploma and JPME Phase I certification.

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  8. International Programs

        The Naval War College maintains two international academic student bodies, the Naval Command College and the Naval Staff College.  The NCC is for select senior international naval officers and a small number of U.S. officers. The NSC is for select junior international naval officers and a small number of U.S. officers.

        Both colleges will gain the same level of understanding U.S. naval officers would acquire and still receive instruction from NWC’s three departments, Strategy and Policy; National Security Decision Making, and Joint Military Operations.  However, international classes will be taught at the unclassified level. In addition to military proficiency, both colleges also intend to foster friendship among international navies.

    1. Naval Command College

          Senior-level international students in the Naval Command College (NCC) are fully integrated in CNW, attending seminars and lectures with their U.S. counterparts. They complete classes, seminar exercises, and writing assignments in JMO and S&P; international officers complete a team project in NSA. International officers may voluntarily take all exams. The faculty evaluates their academic work and provides substantive, written feedback, but does not assign grades to these products.  Additionally, the Field Studies Program is designed to give a balanced understanding of the United States culture and institutions as well as American political, social, and economic life and to give an increased awareness of the basic issues of internationally recognized human rights.

          International officers are encouraged to participate in the Electives Program. They receive graduate level credit for courses completed at the Naval War College which can be applied to Masters program at local Rhode Island universities.

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    2. Naval Staff College

          Intermediate-level international officer students in the ten month NSC course (NSC-10) are fully integrated in CNC&S, attending seminars and lectures alongside their U.S. counterparts. They complete class and seminar exercises and writing assignments in JMO and S&W; international officers complete a team project rather than individual papers in NSDM. They may voluntarily take exams. The faculty evaluates their academic work and provide substantive, written feedback, but do not assign grades to these products. Additionally, the Field Studies Program, designed to promote understanding of U.S. culture and institutions as well as American political, social, and economic life, is an integral element of their core, educational program. They are highly encouraged to participate in the Electives Program.

          NSC-6 intermediate-level international officer students in the six month NSC course (NSC-6) take a separate, condensed, and tailored version of the core CNC&S curriculum. It consists of four major areas of study: S&P, JMO, NSDM, and operational law. They complete class and seminar exercises and writing assignments each. They may voluntarily take exams. The faculty evaluates their academic work and provide substantive, written feedback, but do not assign grades to these products. Additionally, the Field Studies Program, designed to promote understanding of U.S. culture and institutions as well as American political, social, and economic life, is an integral element of their core, educational program. They are highly encouraged to participate in the Elective Program for the spring trimester.

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  9. Student Body

        The Naval War College educates about 600 students each year, separated into five colleges.  Each college is distinct, and may contain senior or junior-level officers; U.S. or international officers; and even students from civilian federal government institutions, such as the Central Intelligence Agency or the Federal Bureau of Investigation.  NWC also admits students from other U.S. armed services.

    1. College of Naval Warfare

          The College of Naval Warfare is a multidisciplinary program for senior level officers in the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, Army and Air Force, typically in the pay grade of O5 or O6. The college also welcomes members of civilian Federal organizations of respective seniority.  This senior level professional military education program provides students with executive-level preparation for higher responsibilities as senior captains/colonels and flag/general officers.

          The chart below indicates the class demographics:

       

       

       

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    2. College of Naval Command and Staff

          The College of Naval Command and Staff is a multidisciplinary program for intermediate level officers in the U.S. Navy , Coast Guard, Marine Corps, Army and Air Force, typically in the pay grade of O4. The college also welcomes members of civilian federal organizations of respective seniority.  This intermediate level service college course provides an initial opportunity for professional military education wherein students prepare for increased responsibilities as commanders/lieutenant colonels and as junior captains/colonels.

          The chart below indicates class demographics:

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    3. Naval Command College

        The NCC enrolls senior international officers, who attend the College of Naval Warfare core courses alongside their U.S. counterparts. Students submit papers and participate in most academic exercises but do not take exams or receive grades. The education for these international officers is a blend of the Naval War College curriculum and Field Studies Program (FSP). This program exposes the students to the American culture, economy, government, and American leaders through a series of scheduled trips throughout the country.

         Graduates receive a Naval War College diploma and transfer credit.

         

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    4. Naval Staff College

          The NSC is a program for intermediate level international officers. The NSC course is comprised of two curriculums: a five and-one-half-month long course that parallels the ten-month college program in the Strategy and Policy, National Security Decision Making, and Joint Maritime Operations departments, in addition to the International Law and Ocean Affairs class. Students submit papers and participate in most academic exercises but students are not required to take exams and don't receive grades.  Naval Staff College students in the five and one-half months course are required to enroll in one elective course during their residency. Students in both programs go on several FSP trips throughout their academic year.

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    5. College of Distance Education

          The College of Distance Education (CDE) provides Naval War College education programs to Naval officers, other service officers, and selected federal civilian employees who cannot attend in residence. The Fleet Seminar Program delivers a seminar-based curriculum taught by adjunct and on-campus faculty members to about 1,200 students annually across the United States. Students attend weekly evening seminars for about thirty-four weeks to complete each of the three core courses. The Web-Enabled Correspondence Program delivers a tailored curriculum taught by CDE faculty to cohorts of about twenty students via the Internet.  The CDROM-based Correspondence Program offers a self-paced program specifically designed for officers assigned to sea duty or in remote locations where access to the Internet is non-existent or severely limited.  The NWC at NPS Program is an in-class seminar program taught to officer students at the NPS that offers the opportunity to earn the JPME Phase I certification and Naval War College Diploma while completing the NPS master's degree.  

          The NWC department chairs and the director of CDE work together to design educational methodologies, buy books, purchase copyright and printing, and deliver quality, rigorous education to the students, both resident and non-resident.

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  10. College of Operational and Strategic Leadership

        The College of Operational and Strategic Leadership (COSL) was formally established in October 2007, and provides Professional Military Education by focusing on leadership. COSL is comprised of three directorates.  The Research and Analysis/Competency Development Directorate is responsible for Mission Essential Competencies (MEC) and Maritime Operations Centers (MOC) Manpower Training & Education Requirements. 

      The Operational Level Programs (OLP) Directorate is responsible for Joint Flag Education (JFMCC/CFMCC) courses, Senior Mentors, Maritime Staff Operators Course (MSOC) to include Battle Lab, and the Assist and Assessment Team (AAT).  The Leadership Directorate is responsible for Leadership Elective courses, Professional Military Ethics, James Bond Stockdale Group, and the Senior Enlisted Academy. It integrates leadership with ethics and character in the Navy's PME continuum for Navy officer and enlisted personnel.  

        The Naval War College delivers the senior flag officer curriculum, called the Joint/Combined Force Maritime Component Commander's course, a leadership course for select groups of flag, general, and senior executive service officers.

        The NWC Assist and Assess Team improves the Navy's capability at the operational level of war by helping the Navy's Maritime Headquarters, by turning the Maritime Operations Center vision from concept into reality.  The team assists fleet MOCs to operate effectively and assesses fleet MHQ/MOCs to support U.S. Fleet Forces Command in accrediting these MOCs. Additionally, the AAT supports Geographic Combatant Commander certification of Joint Force Maritime Component Commanders and in sharing best practices and lessons learned throughout the Fleet.

        This focus also produced the Maritime Staff Operators Course (MSOC) which began in 2007 and now educates about 700 students each year. The college is engaged in student-led operational-level leadership research conducted by the multi-service and international officer Stockdale Group.  The college has also started a Professional Military Ethics Program that provides a series of lectures, panels, seminars and discussion groups to further officers' understanding and application of ethical leadership.

    1. Combined Force Maritime Component Commander Course

          The Combined Force Maritime Component Commander (CFMCC) course is a one-week, flag-level class that addresses the operational-level maritime security challenges faced by the nations of a specific region. It is comprised of flag-level officers from all US services, as well as from invited nations that operate in the region. Two courses are usually held each year, hosted by regional US Navy commanders (i.e., US Pacific Fleet, US Naval Forces Europe, US Naval Forces Central Command). It is taught at the unclassified level.

          The course develops a network of leaders, focused on the operational level, in support of cooperation in the theater, and oriented toward maritime security.  It also helps to evolve the Combined Maritime Command and Control concepts, while advancing the understanding of security issues facing participating nations.

          The CFMCC Flag Course provides executive-level attendees with the background and perspective to effectively and efficiently integrate unique maritime capabilities, in support of the objectives of the combined force, while recognizing the possibility of competing national objectives of participating nations 

          Actual regional concerns, and the CFMCC capabilities to address those concerns, are the basis for course discussions and study.  Retired three and four-star Naval officers ensure course and session objectives are met. The course is based on principles of transparency, non-attribution, and mutual respect for participants to provide a comfortable forum for open discussion of issues to facilitate a better understanding of the various perspectives involved in a combined force.

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    2. Joint Force Maritime Component Commander Course

          The Joint Force Maritime Component Commander (JFMCC) is a one-week, flag-level course at the Naval War College.  It is designed to prepare future maritime component commanders to plan and execute complex maritime operations. Taught at the classified level, only American flag officers are permitted to attend. Most of them are Naval officers, but a small amount of flag officers from other U.S. services attend as well.

          Students come from each of the military services as selected by their service headquarters. The JFMCC Flag Course addresses the practical challenges confronting the maritime operational commander. Actual regional concerns, and the JFMCC capabilities to address those concerns, are the basis for course discussions and study. Further, the course considers existing JFMCC concepts and doctrine, operational-level capabilities, command and control processes and applications, and the considerations and expectations of joint force commanders as well as supporting functional component commanders.

          Retired three and four-star Navy officers ensure course and session objectives are met. The course also brings in experienced subject matter experts as session instructors to develop perspectives necessary to effectively employ naval forces in a joint, coalition, or interagency environment.

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    3. Maritime Staff Operators Course

          The Maritime Staff Operators Course (MSOC) is a practitioners’ course designed for the officer or senior enlisted who have never been on an operational headquarters staff.  Focused on the commander’s decision making cycle of planning, execution, monitoring and assessment, it acquaints the student with the processes and procedures involved with a staff functioning above the tactical level. The course provides significant insights into national and strategic level policy, perspective and guidance, and translating it at the operational level of war into tactical tasking.   MSOC supports NWC's mission to provide a continuum of joint and Navy professional military education (JPME/NPME) and support operational commanders through enhanced education and training.

           MSOC uses joint and service doctrines (as well as developing concepts) presented by uniformed and civilian NWC faculty with joint qualifications and significant command and operational staff experience.  Coursework addresses operational art and design, naval warfare theory, concepts, doctrine, organizations, capabilities, responsibilities, functions, and planning and execution processes, techniques and practices.  The course builds on planning and execution fundamentals, using a combination of classroom lectures, practical application sessions and culminates with a week long battle lab which is a maritime-based scenario functioning as the maritime component commander headquarters (JFMCC).  The exercise scenario spans the entire course allowing students to build upon knowledge gained in the classroom to develop real products for use during execution in this final week battle lab problem.  The battle lab experience replicates a functional organization similar to a nominal maritime headquarters.  Students are integrated into a variety of boards, centers and cells in an operational level battle rhythm in a dynamic execution environment. Successful MSOC graduates will be able to: understand/manage the flow of information within the staff and among subordinate, lateral components and higher headquarters staffs in a collaborative information environment; operate within a normal battle rhythm and be able to participate in any board or cell within an operational level headquarters to support the commander’s decision cycle; apply the Navy planning process as a member of an operational planning team and develop supporting documents and briefing products required by a maritime staff commander; and, apply appropriate staff and control methods to direct subordinate tactical commanders in a timely manner (issue orders/conduct briefs).

           MSOC enhances the Navy's ability to prepare personnel to effectively serve in operational-level maritime staffs with solid familiarization and guided practical experience.  This course supports broader Navy efforts to build expertise at the operational level of war and is in sync with the demands of our fleet commanders.

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    4. Assist and Assess Team

          The Assist and Aassess Tteam (AAT) deliver education sessions to fleet commanders through Tailored Assist Visits (TAVs).  These sessions, delivered by military and civilian faculty are designed to enhance the fleet’s ability to command and control at the operational level of war.

          Leader Development plans, develops, coordinates, monitors, and conducts advanced courses in Joint Military and Joint Maritime Operations and is a continuum of Professional Military Education (PME) for Navy officer and enlisted personnel.  Conducts education on professional military ethics and character development.  Stockdale Chair of Professional Military Ethics plans, coordinates, and delivers the Professional Military Ethics Program for NWC.  The Stockdale Group advances research programs in operational level leadership in Flag Development.  

          Research and Analysis plans for, coordinates, and oversees those actions required of the Naval War College to support a corporate approach to education within the U.S. Navy in an effective and efficient manner and those matters necessary to sustain and strengthen the College’s role and position within the corporate structure that may emerge from the Navy’s adoption of such an approach to education.  It is responsible for strategic planning and policy as they pertain to the College’s role and position within the corporate structure that may emerge from the Navy’s adoption of a corporate approach to education; future PME requirements planning, validation and corporate assessment of the NWC’s performance within the corporate structure that may emerge from the Navy’s adoption of such an approach to education.  Assisting in the development and administering an effective program to assess the progress of the implementation of the College’s Strategic Plan as it pertains to any corporate approach to education adopted by the Navy.  Serving as the College’s spokesperson in the Navy’s ongoing efforts at establishing a Capability Based Competency Assessment (CBCA) approach to support operational commanders.

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  11. Center for Naval Warfare Studies

        The Center for Naval Warfare Studies perpetuates Admiral Luce’s vision of the College as a place of original research on all matters pertaining to war, statesmanship connected with war and the prevention of war.  Focused on the maritime aspect of national security and defense, the center possesses a range of scholarly and analytic capabilities. It fosters critical and innovating thinking on current and evolving operational challenges of importance for the Navy.

        The center directly complements the curriculum at the Naval War College by providing a place for researching important professional issues which, in turn, inform and stimulate the faculty and students in the classroom. Moreover, from its very beginning, the center has linked the Naval War College to the fleet and policymakers in Washington by serving as a focal point, stimulus, and major source of strategic and campaign thought.  

    1. Wargaming Department

          The War Gaming Department conducts high quality research, analysis, gaming, and education to support the Naval War College mission, prepare future maritime leaders, and help shape key decisions on the future of the Navy.  As the world's premier gaming organization, the War Gaming Department conducts approximately 50 games annually in support of internal College needs and externally generated requests from various branches of the Defense and Navy Departments, operational commands and civilian agencies.  To support the objectives of each game's sponsor, the War Gaming Department employs a wide variety of gaming techniques ranging from complex, multi-sided, computer-assisted games to simpler, single-sided seminar games.  Games can range from broad national strategies to operational plans to the specifics of tactics.  Most games take place at the College, but some are conducted off site.   

          War gaming is a valuable research tool for investigating strategic and operational concepts and exercising military and civilian decision makers in maritime and joint warfare.  War gaming is an effective technique for creating a decision-making environment that fosters education and understanding for the participants whether they are students or operational staffs.  War gaming also provides insights into complex problems, is beneficial in assessing risk in operational plans, and helps identify issues associated with potential future force structure. 

      Further information on the War Gaming Department may be found on the website at http://www.usnwc.edu/Research---Gaming/War-Gaming.aspx

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    2. Warfare Analysis and Research Department

           The Warfare Analysis and Research (WAR) Department conducts relevant research into current and future war fighting issues using select Naval War College students working under the mentorship of experienced research professionals.

          Collaborative research efforts are coordinated through student participation in one of the Halsey, Gravely, or the Mahan Scholars research groups while individual research work is guided by faculty from not only within the WAR department but also by faculty throughout the college as appropriate.  This analysis is used to inform key policymakers, commanders and other defense and security professionals.

          Under the management of the Warfare Analysis and Research Department, the Decision Support Center (DSC) provides an innovative environment specifically designed to bring together a range of tools to aid in decision-making, concept development or alternative analysis.  The DSC is available for use by Department of Defense, the Department of the Navy and other government agencies.

          The Warfare Analysis and Research Department website is at http://www.usnwc.edu/Departments---Colleges/Center-for-Naval-Warfare-Studies/Warfare-Analysis-and-Research.aspx .

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    3. Strategic Research Development

          The Strategic Research Department produces studies, research reports, and briefings formulated in accordance with traditional research methods and standards. Some projects are internally generated, while others are written in response to requests from Navy and Marine Corps officials, including the Chief of Naval Operations, or from operational commanders including unified commanders-in-chief.

          Completing some 10 studies annually, the department examines a broad range of national and international security issues, placing particular emphasis on the maritime component of the national strategy, concepts of military operations and national security policy. Recent projects have addressed the impact of political and other changes on U.S. overseas basing, the impact of global changes on the formulation of maritime strategies, and options for maritime support of United Nations sponsored activities.

          Strategic Research Department personnel also host, administer, and participate annually in a number of conferences, meetings and workshops, some with foreign navies. The department's Faculty Enrichment Program brings a variety of notable speakers to the college to address current national policy or strategy issues. Many faculty members also serve as instructors in the college's electives program.

           Within the Strategic Research Department is the China Maritime Studies Institute, a group of scholars, many of whom are fluent in Mandarin Chinese, that study and analyze the open source maritime literature in China, preparing books, monographs and articles that inform naval officers and others on the key trends in Chinese maritime and naval development.

          The Strategic Research Department website is at http://www.usnwc.edu/Research---Gaming/Strategic-Research.aspx

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    4. Historian

          The Maritime Historian of the Center for Naval Warfare Studies serves as the central resource and contact point for the entire Naval War College in matters relating to maritime history. The department carries on the tradition at the Naval War College that was begun in the works of Rear Admirals Stephen B. Luce and Alfred Thayer Mahan in the period between 1884 and 1910. Their fundamental and original contributions to historical research and naval scholarship laid the foundation for today’s modern approaches to the history of naval strategy and naval operations.

          The Historian specializes in the history of the theory and practice of naval and maritime strategy, the history of naval operations in all periods, the history of naval activities in the Narragansett Bay region since the age of exploration, and the history of the Naval War College since 1884. 

         The Maritime History website is http://www.usnwc.edu/Research---Gaming/Maritime-History.aspx .

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    5. Naval War College Press

          The Naval War College Press publishes quarterly the Naval War College Review, which focuses on politico-military, strategic, and operational matters. The NWC Press also publishes both the Newport Papers and full-length books. 

          It also boasts a robust on-line presence at http://www.usnwc.edu/press.aspx .

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    6. International Law Department

          The International Law Department of the Center for Naval Warfare Studies serves as the Naval War College's focal point for the study of international and maritime law and oceans policy as they affect US military policy, strategy and operations.  Through scholarly research, publication, teaching, and international engagement, the Department substantially advances the understanding of complex legal and policy issues confronting the United States and other nations today and in the future.  The Department also hosts an annual international law conference that draws the world’s leading international law experts; provides legal support to War Games; conducts workshops on emerging legal issues, and co-hosts an annual International Law of Military Operations course and Maritime Security Cooperation Workshop for legal advisors from the U.S. and abroad.  When requested, the Department provides advice to the Fleet and other DOD entities on a variety of international, operational, and maritime legal issues.  As part of its research, the Department compiles, edits, and publishes the annual “Blue Book” International Law Studies series that since 1901 has provided a forum for prominent legal scholars to publish articles that contribute to the broader understanding of international law.  The Department also serves as Primary Review Authority for The Commander’s Handbook on the Law of Naval Operations (NWP 1-4M, MCWP 5-2.1, and COMDTPUB P5800.7).  Members of the Department also serve as faculty for International Institute of Humanitarian Law courses on the law of armed conflict, the law of naval operations, and rules of engagement and as guest lecturers at various international law conferences. 

          The International Law Department website is at http://www.usnwc.edu/Research---Gaming/International-Law.aspx

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    7. Office of Naval Intelligence Detachment, Newport

          The Office of Naval Intelligence Detachment (ONI Det) is part of the Office of Naval Intelligence, Washington, DC.  Its mission is to provide intelligence support to research, analysis and wargaming at the Naval War College (NWC), and facilitate ONI access to research and analytic expertise resident at the College. This support includes the design, development, and employment of intelligence support products aligned with NWC war games and both operational and strategic research efforts. 

          Additionally, the ONI Det provides intelligence support to the CNO Strategic Studies Group (SSG).  The Detachment is the point of presence for all Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communication System (JWICS) connectivity in the Newport Naval Complex, including NWC and the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC).

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  12. Henry E. Eccles Library

        The Eccles Library’s primary mission is to maintain collections of physical and digital information resources that support the learning, teaching, and research activities of the college. In addition to providing the information resources themselves, the library staff helps patrons navigate successfully through the rapidly-changing world of information resources and the tools needed for accessing and manipulating that information. Typical library users include anyone associated with college’s educational offerings, as well as its research and analysis activities. The library also supports visiting scholars and dignitaries, as well as some needs of the broader Naval Station Newport community.

        A sampling of library services includes providing reference assistance; offering access to over sixty databases—many of which include full-text articles and reports; instructing patrons on effective use of library tools and services; and operating an interlibrary-loan service that acquires needed materials not currently available in the library.

        The library, named in honor of Rear Admiral Henry Effingham Eccles, a distinguished logistician from the Second World War, is composed of the three primary elements: 

    • The Main Library, located in Hewitt Hall, houses the reference collection, the periodicals collection, the microform collection, the restricted (rare book) collection, the federal (Superintendent of Documents) depository collection, and the general collection. The Main Library contains over 270,000 books and documents, over 1,700 periodical titles (of which over 750 are current subscriptions), and over 500,000 microforms in about 40,000 gross square feet (GSF). About 32,000 volumes are stored remotely in a Windsor, Connecticut book storage facility shared with other New England libraries. The library has 110 library seats on the main level, 28 at computer stations, and an additional 15 in the lobby.  There are 20 carrels and 2 computer stations on the library’s lower level.  
       
    • The Classified Library Branch, housed a secure vault within the Main Library, contains over 53,000 titles (naval warfare publications, CD-ROMs, cassettes, voice recordings) and more than 80,000 volumes. Students, faculty, and staff with secret security clearances may use the Classified Library’s SIPRNET access for searching classified online resources and sending/receiving classified e-mail.
       
    • The Naval Historical Collection, located in Mahan Hall, contains over 1,000 manuscript and archival collections including records of the college, with a total document count of over a 1 million. It also contains a significant oral history collection of World War II naval veterans and individuals associated with the college. The NHC also provides access to records of the former Newport Torpedo Station. These records are stored remotely in Cranston, Rhode Island.

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  13. Senior Enlisted Academy

        The Senior Enlisted Academy (SEA) is a six-week leadership course for Senior Chief Petty Officers.  Classes convene seven times each year.  Each class may also have a limited number of CPOs, MCPOs, International students, and other U.S. service senior enlisted leaders.  The SEA curriculum is designed to strengthen senior enlisted commitment to professional excellence and mission accomplishment through education.  Sessions include communication, organizational development, physical fitness, speaking, writing, problem solving, leadership, and all Enlisted Joint Professional Military Education areas.  Military case studies, Regional and Cultural Awareness lectures, and NWC-sponsored war gaming exercises are also part of the curriculum. 

        The SEA opened its doors in 1981.  Over the years the curriculum has adapted to meet the needs of Navy senior enlisted leaders as they transitioned into positions of increased responsibility, including joint duty assignments.  The SEA is the only educational facility in the Navy PME continuum to provide the enlisted equivalent of JPME Phase I for senior enlisted leaders.  The SEA is a pre-requisite for attending the COB/CMC course, and the enlisted Keystone (Joint) course.

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  14. CNO Strategic Studies Group

        The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Strategic Studies Group (SSG) generates revolutionary naval warfare concepts for the Navy of the future.  Revolutionary implies that the concepts would upset the existing order.  Therefore, these concepts are non-consensual.  The SSG focuses its efforts on warfighting concepts that appear to have great potential, but which Navy organizations are currently not pursuing.

        Adm. James R. Hogg, USN (Ret) is the Director of the SSG, which is a tenant command on the U.S. Naval War College campus in Newport, Rhode Island.  The SSG is co-located with NWC to facilitate collaboration as part of the Navy’s process for naval warfare innovation.

        The SSG is tasked directly by the CNO, and reports only to the CNO.  The CNO personally selects senior Navy officers and approves assignment of USMC, USCG and USAF nominees to serve as CNO Fellows on the SSG.  Working with the President, NWC, the Director handpicks six NWC students to serve a Director Fellows for each SSG. 

        At the completion of each year's efforts, the SSG produces a final briefing to Navy leadership that provides a view of the future Navy along with broad recommendations, detailed roadmaps, and immediately actionable steps to inform and identify near and mid-term decisions to prepare the Navy for that future. 

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  15. Naval War College Museum

        According to legend, in late October 1884, Commodore Stephen B. Luce was rowed from the flagship of the North Atlantic Squadron anchored off Newport to Coasters Harbor Island two miles north of the center of Newport, a site designated earlier that month by the Secretary of the Navy for a new kind of college. Once on the island, Luce proceeded to a large stone building, the former Newport Asylum for the Poor, climbed its rickety stairs, and as he opened the front door solemnly announced to his few companions and the empty grounds, "Poor little poorhouse, I christen thee United States Naval War College."

        Today the "little poorhouse" is a well preserved and stately structure, a National Historic Landmark and home to the Naval War College Museum. Named Founders Hall in honor of the founding fathers of the College, it is uniquely suited for its current purpose. In addition to being the original site of the college, it is where Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, USN, second president (1886-1889) and subsequently a renowned naval historian, first delivered his lectures on sea power—lectures which were first published in 1890 as the epochal The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660-1783.

        As one of twelve naval museums within the Naval History and Heritage Command, the Museum's themes are the history of naval warfare, particularly as studied at the Naval War College, and the naval heritage of Narragansett Bay-a tale that begins with the nation's colonial roots. Its collection consists of items relating to these subjects that are perceived to be of value to scholarship, and it forms the core for exhibits throughout the college and for educational outreach projects. Besides permanent exhibits on the college, the genesis of the Navy in the region, and the evolution of permanent naval installations from the late nineteenth century to the present, the museum features short-term special exhibits relating to college curriculum and to current naval-related topics. In general, museum exhibits identify milestones in the evolutionary development of war at sea; explain the significance of the sea as a factor in the formulation and the attainment of national policy objectives; describe the character, educational philosophy, and mission of the college; and chronicle the eventful relationship of the U.S. Navy with Narragansett Bay and its people.

        While the museum is primarily for the education and the edification of the Naval War College community, it is in a larger sense the corporate memory of the Navy in the region, and it serves as a clearinghouse for naval history information in New England. The museum director, a Naval War College faculty member and subject-area specialist, and staff answer inquiries, provide guidance and orientation talks to visitors on regional naval history and current exhibits, and assist scholarly researchers in the use of the museum holdings. You may also access the U.S. Navy 20th Century Ships History Database, available on a kiosk at the museum.

        The museum is open to the public 10 A.M. to 4:30 P.M., Mondays through Fridays throughout the year, and 12 noon-4:30 P.M. on weekends during June through September. It is closed on holidays. Public access to the Museum with personal vehicle is through Gate 1 of U.S. Naval Station, Newport.  For base access and reservations please call (401) 841-4052 or 2101 at least one working day in advance. Reservations and photo identification are necessary for entry onto the Naval Station Newport. Visitors must stop at the Pass Office before proceeding to Gate 1.

        Large groups, tours and school buses should contact Naval Station Public Affairs Office at (401) 841-1832/3538 and enter through Gate 17 of Naval Station Newport.  Facilities for the handicapped are available, as is a gift shop operated by the Naval War College Foundation (which partially funds museum operations). Further information on exhibits and special events is available by writing to: Director, Naval War College Museum, Naval War College, 686 Cushing Road, Newport, RI 02841-1207, or telephone (401) 841-4052/2101 (DSN 948-4052/2101). Fax (401) 841-7074 or e-mail: museum@usnwc.edu.

    For further information about the museum and its collections, subscribe to the Museum’s weekly blog at http://navalwarcollegemuseum.blogspot.com/ and follow it on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/navalwarcollegemuseum

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  16. Naval War College Foundation

        The Naval War College Foundation encourages and supports the excellence of the Naval War College in carrying out its mission. In doing so, the foundation solicits, receives and administers funds, securities, and gifts-in-kind, which are then provided to the college for the strengthening of its academic, research, simulation and facilities enhancement programs in areas where funding from the U.S. Government is not available.

        The foundation seeks to develop and be prudent stewards of relationships and resources; work to increase public awareness of the Naval War College capabilities, programs and research activities; and assist in sustaining an active alumni affairs program.

        The Naval War College Foundation has vowed to remain a leader in creating and administering programs and services that will enhance its ability to support the college's teaching, research, simulation and public outreach initiatives, and be the standard against which similar foundations are measured.

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  17. Student Expectations

        U.S. military and civilian students detailed to the U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport participate in a ten-month tour of academic and strategic development.  Depending on the curriculum requirements of each semester, students are expected to read anywhere between 500 and 700 pages per week, write regular papers and take exams.  Average student class and study time is 50 to 60 hours per week.  The core curriculum provides the backbone for an accredited Masters of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies. The elective course supplements the core curriculum, allowing each student to pursue a more specialized area of study and in most cases graduate with an Additional Qualification Designator (AQD).  Needless to say, it is a rigorous and incredibly rewarding year requiring significant time management skills. Seminars and lectures typically take place in the mornings between 8:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m., with afternoons dedicated for individual study.  Electives are scheduled once a week on Wednesday or Thursday afternoons from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.  Other mandatory attendance requirements include visiting Flag / General Officer addresses, the Evening Lecture Series, and the Naval Heritage Lecture Series.   

        For questions related to the adjustment between operational and academic life, the Dean of Students Office and the individual Service Advisors stand ready to assist. The Dean of Students Office can be reached by phone at (401) 841-3373.

    1. Student Orientation

         The Dean of Students Office is responsible for the orientation of U.S. students.  After a student is informed by their service / agency of their assignment to NWC, they should be directed to contact the Dean of Students Office by email at: studentpoc@usnwc.edu.  After contact has been established, the student will receive a welcome aboard letter via email containing directions for online enrollment, housing information, preliminary reading requirements, and a preliminary writing assignment.  This same information may be found on the NWC internet site under the “Students” tab.  Resident U.S. students in the College of Naval Command and Staff matriculate in August, October / November, or February.  Resident U.S. students in the College of Naval Warfare matriculate in August, November, or February / March.  

          New-student orientation is a two-day event. Day one briefs include: Introduction to the War College, Core Curriculum, Policies, Resources, Security and Advanced Research Programs.  The President or Provost and the Dean of Academic Affairs welcome all incoming students and participate in these briefs. Day two briefs include: Reading and Writing Expectations and Operational Stress, but is also a day for health assessment, urinalysis testing (military students only), email account set-up, and book issue.  The other services conduct an additional orientation, focusing on service specific requirements and preparations for a year of study at a Navy installation.

           The international orientation is conducted soon after the international students arrive in the United States before their academic programs begin. This two week-long event, designed for both the officers and, if appropriate, their spouses, gives an in-depth introduction to the United States, Newport, the college, and the international colleges. The international officers and spouses are given overviews of American history, government, political system, foreign policy, NWC academics and organization of the U.S. Armed Forces. Staff and others introduce the mission, objectives, and procedures of the college; the Newport naval complex and its supporting services; and the surrounding civilian community, local government, school enrollment, banking, day care, medical, dental, legal, housing, shopping, vehicle purchase/registration, transportation, culture, customs, local area familiarization and other services. As with U.S. students, the President and the Provost personally participate in this orientation program.

           Students in all four programs in the College of Distance Education are provided an orientation to their particular program. Each orientation is designed to ensure that the student has the necessary tools to   understand the methodology and in some cases the technology used in each program. In the Fleet Seminar Program, students are provided contact information for the Program Office in Newport, their professor, and the liaison office for their specific location. Students enrolled in the NWC at NPS Program are provided an orientation through the program manager located at the NPS. Book issue, classroom assignment and all administrative requirements are handled by the Monterey office. Web-Enabled Program students are given a full week of orientation to the Learning Management System of Blackboard. Here they test their computer systems to ensure compatibility. This week also introduces them to their course instructor, the administrative personnel, the Blackboard technical expert, and the program manager. Students applying to the CDROM-based Program are provided an offer of enrollment from the program manager. Once enrolled, a DVD is provided that instructs first time students to verify computer hardware and software requirements needed to begin the program. If shortfalls exist, a link is provided so the student can install the software needed. This DVD also gives the student information on administrative contact personnel as well as CDE full-time faculty that may be contacted.

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    2. Student Support

          Each student in the resident course is issued books, readings, and course materials at no cost. U.S. students must return nearly all of their textbooks.  International students are authorized to retain all issued course materials.  Computers with intranet and internet connections are available in several locations throughout the college.  Students are issued Common Access Card (CAC) readers so they may access the NWC portal from home to complete administrative tasks and academic assignments. Staff and technical support is provided during working hours.  Access to printers, copiers and paper supplies is provided at convenient locations throughout the campus.  Wireless connectivity is available at several locations which students may access using personal laptops.  Also available within the academic complex are the Eccles Library, medical and dental offices, bookstore, barber shop, mailboxes, coffee and food vending machines, and breakfast and lunch (both hot and cold fare) at the Hewitt Café.  A Naval War College identification badge and common access card give students twenty-four hour access to the complex and computer resources.  Library facilities are also available twenty-four hours a day; library staff is available between the hours of 0800 and 1630.  Additional on-campus student services are provided by the Deputy / Chief of Staff’s organization, including security clearances, automobile registration, photo identification, name tags, and audio-visual aids.

          Students in the College of Distance Education are provided all materials needed for each of the core courses in each program.  In addition, through the Blackboard Learning System which is available to most students in all four programs, students have access to the NWC Library data base through which they can then access NWC library facilities.  Additionally, students in the NWC at NPS Program have access to the NPS library facilities.  Also, students in the Fleet Seminar Program have access to the many civilian and other government library facilities in their local areas.  These include such facilities as the U.S. Naval Academy, Joint Intelligence College, Marine Corps University and the Library of Congress.

          The Naval War College is located aboard Naval Station Newport.  Military students and their families benefit from the multifaceted services a naval station offers to the military community.  A nearby Officers’ Club provides food and entertainment and is available to civilian students as well.  For eligible military and civilian students, the Navy Exchange, Commissary, the Navy-Marine Corps Thrift Shop, and Consolidated Package Store offer good value on merchandise, groceries, and beverages.

          Since instruction is presented in English, international students must demonstrate language proficiency on standardized tests before they may attend the college.  Weekly training in English as a Second Language (ESL) is available, offered as an elective for international officer students.  Separate ESL classes are offered to other international students and spouses who desire to hone their English skills.  Additionally, language tapes and CDs are available in Arabic, Croatian, and Spanish for any who would like to learn these languages on their own time.

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    3. Student Counseling

          The dean of students is responsible for the general welfare of all U.S. students in residence. Resident students may seek personal and professional counseling from the dean, their respective military service advisors, or the faculty.  While the dean of students, service advisors, and directors of the international colleges provide professional and personal counseling on an open-door, “drop in any time” basis, faculty seminar moderators meet students regularly during classroom sessions and scheduled tutorials.  Thus, they are often best able to identify students with academic or personal problems and refer them to the appropriate channel for assistance.  Because such a role is an inherent part of military leadership, military faculty members take the lead in this regard.

           When resident students experience difficulty with the stress of the academic environment or other problems, short-term counseling is also available through the Naval Station’s Fleet and Family Support Center, mental health department at the Navy Medical Clinic, as well as the Social Work Department at the Newport Hospital.  NWC CDE students in all programs are afforded the opportunity to contact their respective program managers, course division heads or individual full time and adjunct faculty for any academic or administrative questions or comments they may have.  The CDE Washington, DC office has a full time faculty member and administrative assistant who are responsible for conducting counseling and oversight of the seminars in that area.  The NWC at NPS Program Office has a full time program manager and administrative support personnel who are available to all students enrolled in that program.  Also, at our FSP Additional Instructional Locations there are liaison personnel who assist Fleet Seminar students with administrative requirements and book issue.

          All CDE students, upon graduation, are afforded the opportunity to attend the graduation ceremony in Newport.  CDE sponsors a graduation dinner for the students and their family members the evening prior to graduation and provides those attending a listing of all the activities that occur in conjunction with graduation.

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    4. Religious Activities

          Protestant, Roman Catholic, and Jewish services are conducted throughout the week at the Naval Station’s Chapel of Hope as well as support and outreach to the Islamic community. Navy chaplains maintain contact with local leaders of other religious communities in order to meet the needs of military and civilian personnel, including international students.

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    5. Student Health Services

          Health facilities are available for all military students within the college and for their families at the Naval Health Clinic New England (NHCNE) and the Newport Hospital. On campus, the college also has an Independent Duty Corpsman (IDC) who conducts weekday “sick call,” taking care of minor ailments and referring more severe issues to the nearby clinic for immediate attention or the Newport Hospital after hours. The IDC also oversees a Health Risk Assessment Program that appraises students’ overall health upon entrance and provides training on the benefits of health maintenance.

          During indoctrination, routine laboratory tests are conducted, lifestyles evaluated, and physical exams and counseling are provided. Additionally, a dentist on campus provides full-service care to the college’s military members. Specialized dental care is provided at the Naval Station dental clinic. Civilian students use the medical and dental coverage provided through their federal employment agency.

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    6. Recreation and Extracurricular Activities

          Although the year in Newport is academically challenging, students are encouraged to participate in social, recreational, athletic, and other extracurricular activities that balance their academic pursuits.

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    7. Social Activities

          Throughout the year, students can participate in a wide variety of formal and informal social activities.  As new seminars are formed each semester, faculty members generally arrange social events (e.g. icebreakers) often at their homes, to get acquainted in an informal atmosphere.  Seminars tend to be the organizational unit for student activities.  Military socials begin in the fall with the Navy Ball (October), followed by the Marine Corps Ball (November), the Holiday Ball (December), and the Army Ball (May).  Class, service, and seminar gatherings, as well as trips to various cultural and athletic events, provide the opportunity for interaction between students of other military services and nationalities.  Other opportunities include participation in groups such as the Choristers, the Spouses Club, and Toastmasters Club, and activities such as ballroom dancing classes.  Students are also involved in a wide variety of local community activities, combining recreation with social responsibility.  Many take an active part in holiday food and gift drives; some participate as volunteers for Scout troops, youth sports teams, women’s shelters and soup kitchens; others tutor local elementary, middle and high school students.  Student activities are financed in part by the students themselves, while additional funding comes from Morale, Welfare, and Recreation funds and from the Naval War College Foundation.

          The essential component of the International Program at the college, as well as the vision of the late Admiral Arleigh Burke who founded the program, is the fostering of camaraderie and lifelong friendship among international officers and their U.S. counterparts.  The program aims to create professional and personal ties that will allow close collaboration among professional colleagues to prevent war and, if conflict comes, to work together to gain a decisive victory.  Both international colleges have wardrooms to facilitate informal personal exchanges, and both hold class meetings throughout the year.  Many events are organized by the international colleges’ staffs to familiarize the students and their families with aspects of customs and culture in the United States.  In addition, international students are encouraged to sponsor cultural events that showcase their nations’ culture, traditions, food, and dress.  The President, Provost, Dean of Students and Dean of International Programs participate in many of these cultural and social events.  The international colleges encourage an informal, voluntary program of “in home entertaining,” wherein intermediate international officers invite their classmates and families to their homes to share a bit of their country’s food, culture, history and hospitality in a relaxed setting.

          International students are also introduced to the concept of community service, through interaction with local organizations and clubs.  Luncheons, dinners, or presentations are hosted by the Navy League of the United States chapters in Newport, New York, San Francisco, St. Louis, and Phoenix.  Local clubs, including the Lions Club, the Dunes Club, and the Quindecim Club, host functions for international officers and their spouses to familiarize them with Americans and American life.  During these events, students meet community, political, and business leaders and discuss a wide range of issues and topics.  These events help to demonstrate civilian support of the military and also ways in which many former military members serve their communities in civilian life.

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    8. Athletic Activities and Facilities

          Coordinated by the Dean of Students Office and run by students, group athletics include club sports run through the base gym, the President’s Cup Competition (an interclass/inter-command athletic competition held three times a year), and an Army-Navy Flag Football event. In addition to these organized events, each military professional is required to maintain a high level of personal physical fitness and conditioning. The Naval Station gym, located close to the college, is a full-service facility providing cardio and weightlifting equipment, as well as basketball and racquetball courts, locker rooms, and saunas. Also located near the college are tennis courts, fields for baseball, soccer, and football, and a swimming pool. The gym rents equipment for a wide variety of sports, and sailboats are available for rent at the Naval Station Marina once students have qualified.

          International students compete in athletics with their U.S. seminar counterparts. Sports provide an outstanding opportunity for team and relationship building outside of the classroom. The games are directed, coached and supported by students, staff and faculty.

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    9. Student Organizations

          Executive committees support and oversee academic, athletic, technological, fiscal and social activities. Members are appointed to serve as special representatives and chairs of each respective subcommittee. Seminars participate by nominating representatives for each committee. NCC’s class officers include a sports representative, a social committee chairman, and a travel committee chairman. NSC has a social representative and sports representative.

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    10. Registrar

          The dean of students serves as the registrar and operates the military equivalent of an admissions office and student records office.  The registrar is responsible for development and maintenance of the college wide student database, academic records, statistical data, and biographical records.  The registrar also coordinates transcript preparation and works closely with the academic departments in grade preparation and computation; assists in the determination of eligibility to graduate with distinction and highest distinction; and coordinates graduate degree and diploma preparation for both resident and nonresident students.  The registrar is also responsible for alumni transcripts and biographical data.  Release of personal information regarding students and alumni is in accordance with the Federal Privacy Act.  Transcripts are sent out only upon written request and with authorization from the graduate.  In addition, the registrar coordinates applications for those students desiring to apply for the Strategic Studies Group and oversees the receipt and administration of all civilian student nomination packages.

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  18. Alumni Affairs

        The NWC Office of Alumni Affairs was established in 2009 to build and sustain networks of trust and confidence.  The Alumni Office provides a lifetime learning network of resources, perspectives and educational approaches to all NWC alumni.  Additionally, the Alumni Office facilitates a feedback loop for the improvement of the NWC curricula and programs.

        For more information, visit the Alumni Affairs Webpage:

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  19. Faculty

        The Naval War College maintains a well-qualified, highly experienced faculty to educate students.  The civilian faculty include accomplished professors whose past careers include ambassadorships, and many come from prominent academic instutitions.  In addition to a highly professional civilian faculty, NWC has a large military faculty with decades of military experience.

    1. Academic and Administrative Leadership

      President
      Rear Admiral John N. Christenson
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S. US Naval Academy

      Provost
      Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters
      M.A., Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, 1974; , B.A., Santa Clara University, 1972; Courses at Institut d'Etudes Politiques, Paris, 1970-71.

      Associate Provost 
      Professor William R. Spain
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.A. Salve Regina University, B.A., Randolph-Macon College

      Dean of Academic Affairs
      Professor John F. Garofano
      Ph.D., M.A., Cornell University, M.A. Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, B.A. Bates College

      Chief of Staff
      Captain Russell Knight, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.A., University of Rhode Island

      Library Director
      Professor Terry Metz
      M.L.S. University of Minnesota, B.A. Gustavus Adolphus College

      Dean of Students
      Captain Raymond F. Keledei, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., University of California

      Professor of Professional Military and Graduate Education Effectiveness
      Professor Thomas J. Gibbons
      Ed.D., Johnson & Wales University, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., George Washington University B.S., U.S. Military Academy

      Professor, Director of Writing Center
      Professor Donna Connolly
      Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, M.A., University of Tennessee, B.A., Wheeling Jesuit University

      Professor of Academic Affairs
      Professor Michael J. Sherlock
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional

      Director of Alumni Affairs
      Professor Julia Gage
      J.D., Roger Williams School of Law, B.A., Buffalo State College

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    2. Joint Military Operations

      Chairman, Joint Military Operations Department
      Professor James K. Cook, U.S. Navy (Ret.) 
      CJCS Professor of Military Studies Chair
      M.A., Naval War College B.A., Bennington College Professional Experience: Naval Aviation Phase I/II: I (SLC) II (JFSC); JSO: Yes

      Civilian Faculty

      Professor Jeffrey L. Barker
      Ph.D., Candidate, Salve Regina University M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., Naval Postgraduate School B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology Professional Experience: 29 Years U.S. Navy Meteorology and Oceanography Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Professor Albion A. Bergstrom
      Ph.D., Candidate, Salve Regina University M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., Central Michigan University B.A., Colorado State University Professional Experience: USA (Ret), Armor, Military Strategy, Personnel Management Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor James P. Butler
      Ph.D., Candidate, Capella University M.S., National Resource Strategy, 1995 - Industrial College of the Armed Forces M.A., National Security and Strategic Studies, 1988 - United States Naval War College M.S., Logistics (Material Management), 1983 - Naval Postgraduate School B.S., Analytical Management, 1972 - U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Command, Leadership, and JPME Phase I/II: I: 1988 - United States Naval War College, (SLC) & II: 2001 - Joint Forces Staff College, (SLC); I & II: 1995 - Industrial College of the Armed Forces; JSO: Yes

      Professor David R. Carrington
      M.A., Central Michigan State University B.S., Western Washington State University Professional Experience: Captain, USN (Ret.) - 31 years active duty Phase I/II: No; JSO: Yes

      Professor Donald W. Chisholm
      Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley M.A., University of California, Berkeley B.A., University of California, Berkeley Professional Experience: Professor of Political Science, Public Policy, and Public Administration Phase I/II: No; JSO: No

      Professor Richard M. Crowell
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Professional Experience: Aviation, Information Operations, JPME Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (JFSC); JSO: Yes

      Professor Stephen Forand
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth Professional Experience: USMC Aviation (CH-53) Phase I (ILC) / II (JFSC); JSO: Yes

      Professor William Hartig
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College Highest Distinction M.A., Troy State University Magna Cum Laude B.S., St. John’s University, Professional Experience: USMC Infantry, Amphibious Warfare, Military Linguist, FAO, SAO, JPME Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Douglas N. Hime
      Ph.D., Salve Regina University M.S., University of Southern California B.S., Emporia State University Professional Experience: USAF (Ret), Aviation Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Fred B. Horne
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., Air War College B.S., United States Naval Academy Professional Experience: Aviation (Maritime Patrol) Training and Education, IMET Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Ivan Luke
      Ph.D., Candidate, Salve Regina University M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., U.S. Coast Guard Academy Professional Experience: US Coast Guard Operations Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Professor William McDonald
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College; B.A., Oklahoma City University; Professional experience: Liaison Officer, U.S. Maritime Administration; Senior Maritime Advisor, U.S. Embassy, Iraq. JSO: No.

      Professor Michael E. McGauvran
      Ed.D., Candidate, Johnson and Wales University M.S., National Defense University, Washington M.A., Naval Command and Staff, RI M.P.A, Midwestern University, TX Professional Experience: Chief of Plans, STRATCOM; Pilot, JPME Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: Yes

      Professor George F. Oliver
      Ph.D., Candidate, George Mason University M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.B.A., University of South Carolina B.S., Engineering, U.S. Military Academy Professional Experience: USA Infantry & Special Operations Forces Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Paul A. Povlock
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., University of Maryland B.S., United States Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Submarine Warfare, JPME Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Mark Seaman
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., United States Naval Academy Professional Experience: Naval Aviation Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Professor Eric J. Shaw
      Ph.D., Humanities Salve Regina University M.S., Operations Research University of New Haven M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., Psychology Virginia Tech Professional Experience: USCG Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Richard Shuster
      Ph.D., George Washington University, M.A., University of Massachusetts, Boston, B.A., Clark University, Professional Experience: Analyst, Defense Intelligence Agency.

      Professor Patrick C. Sweeney
      Ph.D., Salve Regina University M.A., Western Kentucky University M.A., School of Advanced Military Studies (Fort Leavenworth) B.S., The Citadel Professional Experience: USA, Artillery; Joint Planning Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Milan N. Vego
      Ph.D., George Washington University M.A., B.A., Belgrade University B.S., Yugoslav Naval Academy Professional Experience: Military History/Operational Art Phase I/II: No; JSO: No


      Military Faculty

      LTC Mark Bieger, U.S. Army
      MMAS Advanced Military Studies, SAMS, M.A. Human Resources, WebsterUniversity, B.S., Civil Engineering, USMA. Professional Experience: Infantry. JPME Phase I/II: I (CGSC); JSO: No.

      Colonel Michael D. Borg, U.S. Army
      M.A., National Security and Strategic Studies, U.S. Naval War College M.A., Military Studies - American Civil War, American Military University B.A., History, Metropolitan State College Professional Experience: Field Artillery Phase I/II: I (CGSC) & II (NWC); JSO: No

      Commander Robert E. Burke, U.S. Navy
      U.S. Navy, M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology B.S., Massachusetts Maritime Academy Professional Experience: Diving and Salvage, Explosives Safety, Counter-IED, JPME Phase I/II: No; JSO: No

      Commander George Byford, U.S. Navy
      M.A., National Security Studies, US Naval War College, M.P.A. Troy State University, B.S. Political Science, Northeastern University. Professional Experience: Explosive Ordnance Disposal. JPME Phase I/II: I (ACSC), II (NWC). JSO: No

      Captain Sharon Campbell, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., Naval Postgraduate School  BFA University of Cincinnati Professional Expertise: Ops/Logistics, Demonstrated Master Logistician Society of Logistics Engineers, JPME I/II, JSO: No

      Colonel Robert M. Cassidy, U.S. Army
      Ph.D., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, Diplôme d'Études Supérieures de Défense, French Joint Defense College, M.A.L.D., Fletcher School, M.A., Boston University, B.A., Fitchburg State College (summa cum laude).  Professional Experience:  Strategy, Combat Aviation.  Phase I and II:  Phase I (ILC) and Phase II (SLC). JSO:  Yes.

      Commander James Dalton, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.A., University of Missouri Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I/II: I (SLC) & II; JSO: Yes

      Captain Michael J. Fitzpatrick, U.S. Navy 
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., University of Maryland B.S., United States Naval Academy Professional Experience: Aviation, Surface Warfare Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (AFSC); JSO: Yes

      Captain David C. Foley, U.S. Navy
      U.S. Navy, U.S., National Resource Strategy, Industrial College of the Armed Forces; M.A. National Security Affairs, Naval Postgraduate School; B.A., Political Science, Miami University; Experience:  Intelligence, JPME Phase I/II (ICAF); JSO: Yes.

      Lt. Colonel Stuart Furner, U.S. Army
      M.S. Leader development and Counseling, Long Island University, B.S., International Relations, US Military Academy. Professional Experience: Infantry. Phase I/II: I (Command and General Staff College); JSO: No.

      Commander John N. Gandy, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., Maine Maritime Academy Professional Military Experience: Naval Aviation (Helicopters) Phase I/II: ILC/Joint Forces Staff College; JQO: Yes

      Colonel Robert Gardner, U.S. Marine Corps
      M.A. National Security and Strategic Studies, NWC; M.S. Management, Saint Mary College; B.S. Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Military Institute; Army Command and General Staff College; School of Advanced Warfighting; Professional Experience: Artillery and Joint Planning; JPME Phase I/II: I and II, JSO: Yes

      Lt. Colonel Robert Glenn III, U.S. Army
      M.S., Michigan State University, Community Counseling Family Life, B.S., Alabama Agriculture and Mechanical University, Electrical Electronic Engineering. Professional Experience: Logistics.  Phase I/II: I (Command and General Staff College); JSO: No

      Commander John Gordon, U.S. Navy
      U.S. Navy, B.A. Mathematics, Northwestern University, M.S. Management, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, M.A. National Security & Strategic Studies, NWC. Professional Experience: Submarine Warfare; JPME Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Captain John T. Kondratowicz, U.S. Coast Guard
      U.S. Naval War College, B.S. Business Admin, Charter Oak State College; Professional Experience: Operations Ashore/Response & Deployable Operations Group. JPME Phase I; JSO: No

      Colonel Kevin M. Masterson, U.S Air Force
      U.S. Air Force, M.A., Air Command and Staff College M.A., American Military University B.A., University of Massachusetts - Lowell Professional Experience: Bombers, Special Operations Aviation, JPME Phase I/II: I (ILC) & (SLC); JSO: No

      Commander Paul E. Matthews, U.S. Navy,
      U.S. Navy, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S. Florida State University, B.S., United States Naval Academy Professional Experience: Meteorology and Oceanography, Intelligence, Surface Warfare, JPME Phase I/II: I and II; JSO: Yes

      Colonel Michael E. McGauvran, U.S. Air Force
      Ph.D., Candidate, Johnson and Wales University M.S., National Defense University, Washington M.A., Naval Command and Staff, RI M.P.A, Midwestern University, TX Professional Experience: Chief of Plans, STRATCOM; Pilot Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: Yes

      Commander Mark McManus, U.S. Navy
      U.S. Navy, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Professional Experience: Aviation JPME Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (JFSC); JSO: Yes

      Lt. Colonel Antonio J. Morabito III, U.S. Marine Corps
      U.S. Marine Corps B.A., American University International Studies, M.P.A. Public Administration Oklahoma University, M.A. National Security Studies, Naval War College, Professional Experience: Communications, JPME Phase I: (CNC&S) JSO: No

      Captain Roy Petty, U.S. Navy
      M.A. National Security and Strategic Studies, NWC, B.A. Business, University of Texas, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare and Cryptology, Cyber Operations. Phase I/II: I (NWC) & II (AFSC); JSO: Yes

      Commander Chad E. Piacenti, U.S. Navy
      M.A. National Security and Strategic Studies, NWC, B.S. Psychology, Duke University, Professional Experience: Intelligence, Targeting and Military Planning. Phase I/II: I (NWC) & II (JFSC); JSO: No  

      Lt. Colonel Dee S. Rosser, U.S. Marine Corps
      U.S. Marine Corps M.A. National Security and Strategic Studies, Naval War College; M.A. National Security Affairs - East Asia, Naval Postgraduate School; B.A. Political Science, University of South Carolina; Professional Experience: Infantry, East Asia - Korea / China, Operational Planning, JPME Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (JFSC); JSO: Yes

      Captain Thomas C. Sass, U.S. Navy
      Ph.D. (ABD), The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University M.P.A., Harvard University B.A., Yale College Professional Experience: Special Warfare (SEAL) Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: Yes

      Lt Colonel Reagan Schaupp, U.S. Air Force
      M.A. Management Information Systems, University of Montana, B.A. Clemson University; Professional Experience: Space Operations; Phase I/II: Air Command and Staff College) and II  (AWC Distance);
      JSO: No

      Lt. Colonel Justin Speegle, U.S. Air Force
      M.S. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Air University Masters of Military Art and Science; B.A. Long Beach State University; Professional Experience: Aviation Helo; Phase I/II: ( (ILC); JSO: No

      Lt. Colonel Matthew Stanton, U.S. Army
      M.A. Leader Development and Counseling, Long Island University, B.S., International Relations, US Military Academy. Professional Experience: Infantry. Phase I/II: I (Command and General Staff College); JSO: No.

      Colonel Timothy White, U. S. Air Force
      U.S. Air Force, M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., Air Command and Staff College M.S., Troy State University B.A., University of South Florida Professional Experience: Aerial Refueling, Acquisition, JPME Phase I/II: I (ACSC) & II SLC; JSO: No

      Commander Robert Wilson, Royal Navy. Professional Experience: Surface Warfare. JSO: No.

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    3. National Security Affairs

      Civilian Faculty

      Chair, National Security Affairs Department 
      Dr. David A. Cooper
      Ph.D., Australian National University, M.A., Columbia University, B.A, Oberlin College

      Professor Hayat Alvi
      Ph.D., Howard University M.A., University of Michigan B.A., University of South Florida

      Professor David T. Burbach
      Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology B.A., Pomona College

      Professor Emeritus William M. Calhoun
      J.D., University of Georgia School of Law M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., U.S. Naval Academy

      Ambassador John A. Cloud
      M.A. George Washington University, B.A., University of Connecticut

      Professor James Cook
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Military Academy West Point

      Professor Roger H. Ducey
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., Embry Riddle Aeronautical University B.A., University of Miami

      Professor Thomas R. Fedyszyn
      Ph.D., M.A., The Johns Hopkins University B.S., U.S. Naval Academy B.A., Grove City College

      Professor Nikolas Gvosdev
      Ph.D., St. Anthony’s College, Oxford M.A., Oxford University M.A., Georgetown University

      Professor Christopher Jasparro
      Ph.D., University of Kentucky M.A., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill B.A., University of Vermont

      Professor Joan Johnson-Freese 
      Ph.D., Kent State University M.A., Case Western Reserve University B.A., Bowling Green State University

      Professor Kevin P. Kelley
      M.B.A., New Hampshire College B.A., Holy Cross College

      Professor Stephen Knott
      Ph.D., Boston College B.A., Assumption College

      Professor Emeritus Richmond M. Lloyd
      William B. Ruger, Chair of National Security Economics
      Ph.D., B.S., University of Rochester M.B.A., University of Chicago

      Professor Solomon Major
      Ph.D. Stanford University, M.A., Georgetown University, B.A., University of California at Santa Barbara

      Professor Laurence L. McCabe
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., University of Phoenix B.S., University of Texas

      Professor Thomas M. Nichols
      Ph.D., Georgetown University M.A., Columbia University B.A., Boston University

      Professor Richard J. Norton
      Ph.D., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy M.A.L.D., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy M.A., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy B.A., Tulane University

      Professor Mackubin Owens
      Ph.D., University of Dallas M.A., Oklahoma University B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara

      Professor T. Negeen Pegahi
      Ph.D., University of Chicago, M.A., University of Chicago, B.A., Williams College

      Professor Ronald E. Ratcliff
      Ph.D., Salve Regina University M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., Naval Postgraduate School B.S., University of Montana

      Professor Mary B. Raum
      Ph.D., University of Washington M.S., Johns Hopkins University B.S., University of Maryland

      Professor Derek S. Reveron
      Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago M.A., University of Illinois at Chicago B.A., University of Illinois at Chicago

      Professor Terence J. Roehrig
      Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison M.A., Marquette University B.A., Cardinal Stritch University

      Professor John R. Schindler
      Ph.D., McMaster University M.A., University of Massachusetts B.A., University of Massachusetts

      Professor Albert J. Shimkus, Jr.
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., Salem State College B.S., George Washington University

      Professor Paul J. Smith
      Ph.D., J.D., University of Hawaii, Manoa M.A., University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies B.A., Washington & Lee University

      Professor Andrew L. Stigler
      Ph.D., Yale University M.A., University of Chicago B.A., Cornell University

      Professor Dana Struckman,
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., Lesley University B.S., University of Nebraska

      Professor Sean C. Sullivan
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.A., University of Rochester

      Professor Kathleen A. Walsh
      M.A., Columbus University B.A., George Washington University


      Military Faculty

      Commander Brent L. Boston, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S. Vanderbilt University, Professional Experience: Submarine Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Colonel Stephen Charbonneau, U.S. Air Force
      M.A. Naval War College, M.S. Central Michigan University, B.S. Lake Superior State College, Professional Experience: B-52 Navigator, Phase I/II: I (ILC) and II (SLC); JQO: No

      Captain Mike Haumer, U.S. Navy
      M.S. Naval Postgraduate School, B.S. US Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Submarines, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Commander Gregory LaFave, U.S. Navy
      M.A. Naval War College, B.S. Jacksonville University, B.S. University of Florida, Professional Experience: Helicopter Pilot, Phase I/II: II (SLC), JQO: No

      Lt. Colonel Michael Mahony, U.S. Army
      M.A., Army Command and General Staff College M.A., Naval Postgraduate School B.S., University of Rhode Island Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Commander Kevin McGowan, U.S. Navy
      M.A., Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy

      Commander J. Scott McPherson, U.S. Navy
      Ph.D., Salve Regina University M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.A., University of Arkansas Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Colonel Christopher J. Mullin, U.S. Marine Corps
      B.A., Providence College

      Colonel Michael Pratt, U.S. Air Force
      M.B.A., University of Maine, M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., Webster University, B.S., University of Maine 

      Lt. Colonel Reginald Smith, U.S. Air Force
      M.A., Air War College M.A., Air Command and Staff College M.S., Embry Riddle Aeronautical University B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology Professional Experience: Tactical Airlift Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (SLC);
      JSO: No

      Lieutenant Colonel Mark E. Solomons, U.S. Army
      M.A., Army Command and General Staff College M.A., Kansas State University

      Lt. Colonel Jayme Sutton U.S. Army
      M.A. Naval War College, B.B.A. Texas Christian University, Professional Experience: Force Sustainment, Phase I/II: I (ILC), JQO: No

      Lt. Colonel Michael Waters, U.S. Air Force
      M.A., Salve Regina University M.A., Air Command and Staff College B.A., Montana State University Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

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    4. Strategy and Policy

      Civilian Faculty

      Chair, Strategy and Policy
      Professor John H. Maurer,
      Ph.D., The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University M.A.L.D., The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University A.B., Yale University

      Professor Andrea J. Dew
      Co-Director of the Center for Irregular Warfare and Armed Groups
      Ph.D., The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University M.A.L.D., The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University B.A. (Hons.), Southampton University

      Professor F. Scott Douglas
      Co-chair, Insurgency and Terrorism Area of Study
      Ph.D., Columbia University M. Phil, Columbia University M.A., Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) B.S., Foreign Service, Georgetown University

      Professor Marc A. Genest
      Forrest, Sherman Chair of Public Diplomacy Co-chair, Insurgency and Terrorism Area of Study
      Ph.D., Georgetown University M.A., Georgetown University B.A., University of Rhode Island

      Professor James Holmes
      Ph.D., The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University M.A.L.D., The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University M.A., Providence College M.A., Salve Regina University Diploma, U.S. Naval War College B.A., Vanderbilt University

      Professor Timothy D. Hoyt
      Co-chair, Indian Ocean Regional Studies Group
      Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University - Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies M.A., Johns Hopkins University - Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies B.A., Swarthmore College

      Professor Colin Jackson
      Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania, The Wharton School M.A., Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) A.B., Princeton University

      Professor David E. Kaiser
      Admiral William V. Pratt Chair in Military History
      Ph.D., Harvard University M.A., Harvard University B.A., Harvard University

      Professor Heidi E. Lane
      Regional Studies Chair, Greater Middle East
      Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles M.A., University of California, Los Angeles B.A., University of Chicago

      Professor Bradford A. Lee
      Philip A. Crowl Chair of Comparative Strategy
      Ph.D., Cambridge University B.A., Yale University Professor Kevin D. McCranie Ph.D., Florida State University M.A., Florida State University B.A., Florida Southern College

      Professor Alfred Magleby
      M.A. United States Naval War College, B.A. Brigham Young University 

      Professor Thomas G. Mahnken
      Jerome Levy Chair of Economic Geography and National Security. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University M.A., Johns Hopkins University B.A., University of Southern California. 

      Prof Kevin D. McCranie
      Ph.D., M.A., Florida State University, B.A. Florida Southern College

      Professor Michael Morgan
      Ph.D., Yale University M.Phil., Yale University M.A., Yale University M.Phil., University of Cambridge B.A., University of Toronto

       Professor Sarah C. M. Paine
      Co-chair, Asia-Pacific Area of Study
      Ph.D., M.I.A., Columbia University M.A., Middlebury College B.A., Harvard University

      Professor Michael F. Pavkovic
      Ph.D., University of Hawaii, Manoa B.A., The Pennsylvania State University Professor Joshua Rovner Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology M.A., Boston College B.A., University of California, San Diego

      Professor Joshua Rovner
      Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, M.A. Boston College, B.A. University of California, San Diego

      Professor Nicholas E. Sarantakes
      Ph.D., University of Southern California M.A., University of Kentucky B.A., University of Texas

      MIchael Vlahos
      Ph.D., The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University M.A.L.D., The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University A.B., Yale University

      Professor Karl F. Walling
      Ph.D., University of Chicago M.A., University of Chicago B.A., St. John's College

      Professor Andrew R. Wilson
      Ph.D., Harvard University B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara

      Professor Toshi Yoshihara
      Ph.D., The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University M.A., Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) B.S.F.S, Georgetown University


      Military Faculty

      Commander Kyle B. Barrett, U.S. Navy
      M.A. Naval War College, M.S. Carnegie College, B.S. Guilford College, Professional Experience: Aviation, Phase I/II: I (ILC) and II (JFSC), JQO: Yes

      Commander Michael A. Borrosh, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., United States Naval Academy Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Colonel David A. Brown, U.S. Army
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.M.A.S., School of Advanced Military Studies M.S., Long Island University B.A., Carson Newman College Professional Experience: Artillery, Operational Planning Phase I/II: II (ILC);
      JSO: No

      Captain Michael A. Carambas, U.S. Navy
      M.S., Air University, B.A., University of San Diego  Professional Experience: Aviation, Carrier Strike Group Operations Phase I/II: I & II (AWC) JQO: Yes

      Commander Kevin J Delamer, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., United States Naval Academy Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I/II: I (CDE); JSO: No

      Commander Christopher J. Dennis, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College; B.A., Auburn University; Professional Experience: Aviation; Phase I/II: I (NWC) & II (JFSC); JSO: Yes

      Captain Michael R. Fierro, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., United States Naval Academy Professional Experience: Surface Phase I; JSO: No 

      Commander Robert J. Flynn, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., Troy University B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Captain David M. Hendricks, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., University of Virginia Professional Experience: Submarines Phase I/II: I (CDE); JSO: No 

      Colonel Phil Haun, U.S. Air Force
      Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, M.A. Vanderbilt University, A.B. Harvard University Professional Experience:  A-10 Pilot, Phase I/II: II (SLC), JQO: No 

      Commander Peter R. Jannotta, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University Professional Experience: Surface Warfare Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Lt. Colonel Michael S. Hough, U. S. Air Force M.A., University of Great Falls M.A., Air Command and Staff College M.A., Naval War College B.S., Texas Tech University, Professional Experience: Space and Missile Ops, Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (SLC) JSO: No

      Lt. Colonel Paul C. Krajeski, U.S. Army
      Ph.D., Florida State University B.S., United States Military Academy Professional Experience: Infantry Phase I/II: (CGSC); JSO: No

      Captain William J. Nolan, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., United States Naval Academy Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: Yes

      Commander John Pucciarelli, U. S. Navy 
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.A., College of the Holy Cross Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Fleet Support Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Lt. Colonel Lee F. Schram, U.S. Marine Corps
      M.A. U.S. Naval War College, B.A. University of Wisconsin, Professional Experience: Aviation, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Lt. Colonel Michael P. Winkler, U. S. Air Force M.A., Air Command and Staff College M.A., Naval War College B.A., U.S. Air Force Academy Professional Experience: Aviation (F-15C), Combat Planning Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (SLC) JSO: Yes 

      Commander Bryan D. Williams, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: FA-18  Aviation Phase I/II: I (ILC) JSO: No

      Commander Christopher S. Wiseman, U. S. Navy
      M.A. Naval War College, A.B. Princeton University, Professional Experience: Aviation, Phase I/II: I (ILC), JSO: No

      Back to Top ^

    5. International Programs

      Naval Command College

      Director, Naval Command College
      Captain Steve Senteio, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., University of Connecticut Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I: I JQO: No

      Deputy Director, Naval Command College
      Commander John Kurtz, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I/II: I & II JQO: No 

      Naval Staff College

      Director, Naval Staff College
      Captain Richard A. Rainer, Jr., U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Army War College M.S., The George Washington University B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Professional Experience: SWO Phase I/II: I; JQO: No 

      Deputy Director, Naval Staff College
      Commander John A. Menke, III, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.A., Pace University Professional Experience: Aviation Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II; JQO: Yes 

      International Programs 

      Commander Claro W. Villareal, U.S. Navy
      B.S. Economics, United States Naval Academy, M.A. National Security Affairs, Naval Post Graduate School Professional experience: Surface JPME I/II: Completed phase I JQO: No 

      Commander William Ellis, U.S. Navy
      College degree: B.S.(Engineering Systems) United States Merchant Marine Academy Post grad degree: M.S.(Int'l Business Logistics) State University New York, Bronx Professional Experience/Certification: U.S. Naval Nuclear Power School (1120) JPME I: Yes - USMC University 2010 JQO - Yes 

      Commander Tomas A. Alksninis, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College  B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Professional Experience:  Aviation, FAO (Attaché) Phase I/II: I & II; JQO: Yes 

      Commander Gary W. Parker, U.S. Navy
      B.S. Physical Science, United States Naval Academy M.A. National Security Affairs, Naval Post-Graduate School Professional experience: Aviation, Attache JPME: I JQO:  No

      Back to Top ^

    6. College of Distance Education

      Newport Faculty

      Director, College of Distance Education
      Professor Timothy H. Jackson
      M.A., Salve Regina University B.A., Bridgewater State University Professional Experience: Surface Warfare; Navy Personnel; Financial and Academic Management; Organizational Development Phase I/II: ILC (pre-JPME) JSO: No

      Professor George H. Baker, Jr.
      M.A. U.S. Naval War College, M.A. University of Rhode Island, B.S. US Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Submarine Warfare, Phase I/II: II (SLC), JQO: No

      Professor Michael J. Barker
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.G.S., The University of Massachusetts Professional Experience: Aviation; Navy/Marine Corps Operations Planning; Acquisition; International Relations; Academic Course Management Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Professor Robert L. Carney
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., U.S. Military Academy Professional Experience: Theater Missile Defense; OIF; OEF Phase I/II: I & II; JSO: Yes

      Professor Stanley D. M. Carpenter
      Ph.D., Florida State University M.LITT., University of St. Andrews (Scotland) B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Professional Experience: Surface Warfare; Homeland Security; History; International Relations Phase I/II: I; JSO: No

      Professor James B. Ellsworth
      Ph.D. M.B.A., Syracuse University M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., Clarkson University Professional Experience: Military Intelligence; Information Operations; Stability and Support Operations Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Professor William D. Ferree
      Ph.D., Salve Regina University M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., Naval Postgraduate School A.B., Grove City College Professional Experience: Surface Warfare; Proven Manpower Analyst Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Roger Fountain, II
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., University of Southern California B.S., University of Denver Professional Experience: Reconnaissance Operations; USAF Navigator/Weapons Systems; Joint Planning; Combined Operations; Operational Air Support Phase I/II: I & II; JSO: No

      Professor Timothy S. Garrold
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Surface Warfare; Command at Sea; Command Ashore (Joint); Mine Warfare; Academic Program Management Phase I/II: I; JSO: No

      Professor Christopher J. Gregor
      M.A., Florida State University M.S., Naval Post-Graduate School B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Artillery; Intelligence; Amphibious Operations; Joint operations Phase I/II: I & II; JSO: Yes

      Professor James Hickey
      Ph.D., Salve Regina University M.A., King’s College, University of London B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Naval Aviation Joint Maritime Operations Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Norman E. Hitchcock
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S. Ed., Old Dominion University B.S. Ed., Delta State University Professional Experience: Ground Combat Arms; Joint Operations; International relations Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor John Jackson
      C.A.G.S., M.S., Salve Regina University, M.Ed. Providence College, B.U.S., University of New Mexico, Diploma, Naval War College, Professional Experience: Supply and Logistics, Adult Education, Phase I/II: I; JQO: No

      Professor David A. Kelly, Jr.
      J.D., Texas Tech University School of Law M.B.A., National University B.S. Eng., University of Pennsylvania Professional Experience: Surface Warfare; Expeditionary warfare; Joint/combined Operations; MOOTW; Attorney Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Professor David S. Magill
      Ph.D., Salve Regina University M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., Central Michigan University B.A., University of Massachusetts Professional Experience: Antisubmarine Warfare; Maritime Patrol Aviation; Program Evaluation; Defense Resource Management; Certified Online Instructor; Instructional Systems Design Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Professor Richard J. Martin, Jr.
      M.A., Salve Regina University B.S., A.S., University of Maine Professional Experience: Aviation Command and Control; Staff Planning; Joint Operations; Education; International Relations Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Professor Alan J. Neff
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.B.A., Webster University B.A., The Ohio State University Professional Experience: Naval Aviator; Interagency; Combined Operations; International Relations Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Professor Ron Oard
      M.A. U.S. Naval War College, M.S. Naval Postgraduate School, B.S.E. Purdue University, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Military History; Phase I/II: II (JFSC); JQO: Yes

      Professor Steven Pierce
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.P.A., Troy State University B.A., University of the State of New York Professional Experience: Naval Aviation; ISR; Education; Public Administration Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Glenn C. Powers
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., Salve Regina University B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Naval Aviation; ASW; Joint and Combined Operations; NATO OIC; Political Science; International Relations; SOUTHCOM Team Lead Phase I/II: I (ILC & SLC); JSO: No

      Professor John D. Roberts
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., Salve Regina University B.S., State University of New York at Oswego Professional Experience: Maritime Patrol Aviation; Counter Drug Operations; Technology Development Phase I/II: I & II (SLC & JFSC); JSO: No

      Professor Angus K. Ross
      M.A., Providence College M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., Exeter University (United Kingdom) Professional Experience: Surface Warfare; USW; Joint Planning; Air Group Planning; Multi- National and NATO Operations Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Joyce E. Sampson
      Ph.D., Florida State University M.A., B.A., Kent State University Professional Experience: History; Western Civilization; Islam/Middle East Phase I/II: No; JSO: No

      Professor Douglas V. Smith
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., Naval Postgraduate School B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Naval Aviation; Maritime Patrol; ASW; Military History; Naval History Phase I/II: I; JSO: No

      Professor Paul J. St. Laurent
      Ph.D., Florida State University, M.A., Providence College M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., Webster University M.Ed., Boston University B.S., The University of Massachusetts Professional Experience: Logistics, Contracting, Joint Planning and Operations; NATO Planning; European History; Education Phase I/II: I & II (SLC); JSO: Yes

      Professor Michael F. Van Vleck
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Professional Experience: Military Sealift Command; Special Warfare; Merchant Marine; Southeast Asia; South America Phase I/II: I; JSO: No

      Professor Leonard W. Wildemann
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.A., B.A., Villanova University Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Joint Maritime Operations; Political Science; International Relations Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No


      Monterey Faculty

      Professor George W. Baer
      Ph.D., Harvard University M.A., B.A., Oxford University A.B., Stanford University Professional Experience: Naval History; Strategy and Policy Phase I/II: No; JSO: No

      Professor Harold D. Blanton
      Ph.D., M.A., Florida State University B.S., Valdosta State University Professional Experience: European History Phase I/II: No; JSO: No

      Professor J. Warwick Boulton
      M.A., Lehigh University B.Sc., London School of Economics and Political Science Professional Experience: Teaching and Research in National Security Affairs Phase I/II: No; JSO: No

      Professor Jan S. Breemer
      Ph.D., M.A., University of Southern California B.A., California State University Professional Experience: Teaching and Research in National security Affairs Phase I/II: No; JSO: No

      Professor Richard Mitchell Brown, III
      M.S., Naval Postgraduate School M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Air Warfare/Combat; surface Warfare; Strategic Planning; Naval Intelligence; European Area; ASW Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: Yes

      Professor Jonathan E. Czarnecki
      Ph.D., M.A., State University of New York B.S., Clarkson University Professional Experience: C4I; EW/IO; Strategic Intelligence and Planning; Manpower; Joint Resource Management Phase I/II: I & II; JSO: Yes

      Professor Fred P. Drake, Jr.
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.S., Troy State University B.S., University of Idaho Professional Experience: Naval Aviation; EW; Academic Management; IO; Strategic Planning Phase I/II: I; JSO: No

      Professor Richard B. Grahlman
      M.S., Naval Postgraduate School B.S., Oregon State University Professional Experience: Strategic Planning; Joint Operations; Naval Aviation; Amphibious Warfare Phase I/II: I & II (NDU); JSO: Yes

      Professor Kenneth Hagan
      Ph.D. Claremont Graduate School, M.A., A.B. University of California, Berkley, Professional Experience: US History, Foreign Policy, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Randall J. Hess
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College A.M., Stanford University B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Naval Aviator; Air Warfare; Joint and Combined Operations (NATO); National Security and Strategic Studies; Education and Training Management Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No

      Professor Michael W. Jones
      Ph.D., Florida State University M.S., B.A., University of New Orleans Professional Experience: Naval Intelligence Phase I/II: I; JSO: No

      Professor Casey J. Lucius
      Ph.D. University of Hawaii, M.A. Naval Postgraduate School, B.A. Ashland University Orleans, Diploma, US Naval War College, Professional Experience: Naval Intelligence, Political Science, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Michael McMaster
      M.S., Naval Postgraduate School B.B.A., University of New Mexico Professional Experience: Surface Warfare; ASW; Joint Special Operations Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Thomas P. Moore
      Ph.D., Virginia Tech M.S., Stanford University B.A., Northeastern University Professional Experience: Logistics; Planning and Operations; Operations Research, Systems and Cost Analysis Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No

      Professor Dane Nix
      Ph.D. Salve Regina University, M.A. US Naval War College, Th.M. Duke University, M.Div Denver Seminary, B.A. University of Colorado, Professional Experience: Chaplain, Combatant Command Staff, Phase I/II: I (ILC), JQO: No

      Professor Gary J. Ohls
      Ph.D., M.A., Texas Christian University M.A., U.S. Naval War College M.B.A., California State University A.B., Friends University Professional Experience: Defense Program Planning; Crisis Management; American, Military and Naval History Phase I/II: I; JSO: No

      Professor David F. Overton
      M.S., Naval Postgraduate School B.S.P., East Carolina University Professional Experience: Naval Aviation; Information Technology; Electronic Warfare Phase I/II: I; JSO: No

      Professor Donald J. Stoker
      Ph.D., Florida State University M.A., B.A., Valdosta State University Professional Experience: Strategy and Policy; world History; European Military and Diplomatic History Phase I/II: No; JSO: No


      Washington Faculty

      Professor Charles C. Chadbourn, III
      Ph.D., University of Washington M.A., B.S., Louisiana Technical University Professional Experience: Surface Warfare; Strategy and Policy Phase I/II: No; JSO: No

      Fleet Faculty 

      National Security Decision Making 

      Professor Virginia Gladding (Baker)
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.A.T., Vanderbilt University, B.A., Mary Washington College, Professional Experience: Intelligence, CJCS Staff, Air Staff, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: Yes

      Professor Edmund W. Berry
      M.S., Air Force Institute of Technology, B.A., Seton Hall University, Diploma, Armed Forces Staff College, Professional Experience: Naval Aviator, ASW, Amphibious Operations, Joint Staff, Phase I/II: pre-JPME (AFSC); JQO: Yes

      Professor Robert Buehn
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., University of Florida, Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, Squadron Level command, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Bruce T. Clark
      J.D., B.A., Seattle University, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Naval Special Warfare, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Robert E. Cyboron
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.A., Naval Postgraduate School, B.A., Tufts University, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Anti-Submarine Warfare, National Intelligence, and Naval, Intelligence, International Relations (Pacific Rim focus), Joint and Combined Operations, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Richard Finn
      Ph.D., M.A., Salve Regina University, B.S., Southern Connecticut State University, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Amphibious/Expeditionary Operations, Operations, Analysis, NATO Intelligence Analysis, Mid-East & North African Political/Military Affairs Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: Yes

      Professor William H. Forman, Jr.
      J.D., B.A., Tulane University, M.A., Louisiana State University, Professional Experience: USAF JAGC, Political Science, International Law and National Security Law, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Stephen Fought
      Ph.D., Brown University, M.S., University of Southern California, B.S., Georgia Tech Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Joint Staff, Joint Strategic Planning Staff Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Richard B. Goetze
      Ph.D., M.A., American University, B.S., U.S. Air Force Academy, Diploma, Air War College Diploma, Air Command & Staff College, Professional Experience: Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Defense Attaché, Phase I/II: pre-JPME (SLC); JQO: Yes

      Professor Paul HolmanPh.D., M.A., Georgetown University, A.B., Harvard University, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College Professional Experience: Air Force Intelligence, Joint Intelligence, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor William C. Keller
      Ph.D., Walden University, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, B.A., Colgate University Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Shannon Kentner
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.B.A., University of Maryland, B.A., Missouri State University Professional Experience: National Mapping and Imagery Agency (NIMA), Phase I/II: II (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor Thomas C. Linn
      M.A., Naval War College, M.A., Georgetown University, B.A., Virginia Military Institute, Professional Experience: Ground combat operations, Joint and Coalition Operations, International, Relations, Joint Strategic Planning System, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Jerome Martin
      M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, M.A., Salve Regina University, B.S., University of Cincinnati Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Naval Surface Warfare Officer, Convoy Commodore, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Robert Martin
      Fulbright Scholar La Sorbonne, Ed. D., University of San Diego, M.A., University of Northern Colorado B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, ASW, CIC, Naval Aviation, helicopters, wing & type, Commander staff’s, human resource management specialist, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Stephen V. McBrien
      Ph.D., M.Ph., M.A., Columbia University, B.A., Catholic University of America, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Deputy Director, National Security Analysis Group, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor C. Philip Nichols, Jr.
      J.D., University of Baltimore School of Law, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, A.B., Georgetown University, Professional Experience: Naval JAG Officer, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Cynthia S. Perrotti
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., Wright State University, Ohio, B.S. Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, Indiana, Professional Experience: Acquisition Officer, Joint Experimentation, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Robert L. Powers
      M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Expeditionary Warfare, Information Warfare, Joint Operations, Political Science, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Dorothy A. Prose
      M.A., Naval War College, M.B.A., George Washington University, B.A., College of St. Teresa Professional Experience: Shore Station Management, Joint/NATO Duty, Communications, Recruiting Phase I/II: pre-JPME (SLC); JQO: Yes

      Professor Stanley B. Weeks
      Ph.D., M.A., American University, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Diploma, National War College Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Joint and Combined Operations, International Relations Phase I/II: I & II (SLC); JQO: Yes

      Professor Mark Wegge
      M.A., U.S. Army War College, B. A., Northern Illinois University,  Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor Theodore W. Wu
      J.D., Boston University School of Law, M.S., Tufts University, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Strategic and Operations Analysis, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Joint Maritime Operations

      Professor Frank Baker
      M.S., U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.A., Pennsylvania State University, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Oceanography, Joint Maritime Operations Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor Paul S. Bloch
      M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, M.A., Salve Regina University, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, Joint Planning and Operations, Operations Analysis, Phase I/II: pre-JPME (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor Gregory E. Bolan
      M.M.A., University of Rhode Island, B.S., Mount Saint Mary’s University, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, War Gaming Exercises, Installation Management, JointPlanning and Operations, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor John E. Brence
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.P.A., Troy State University, B.S., U.S. Air Force Academy, Professional Experience: Joint Air Operations, Command and Control, Joint Operations, Military History, Public Administration, Education, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor James T. Carroll, III
      M.B.A., City University of London, United Kingdom, M.A., Salve Regina University, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.A., Villanova University, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Joint Operations, Command and Control, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor Michael L. Cluff
      M.A., Salve Regina University, B.S., Michigan State University, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Marine Infantry Officer, Joint Staff and COCOM, Joint Operations, International Relations, Phase I/II: I & II (SLC); JQO: Yes

      Professor Michael R. Critz
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Diploma, Armed Forces Staff College, Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, Antisubmarine Warfare, Joint Operations and Planning, Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (AFSC); JQO: No

      Professor Francis J. Cummings
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., Salve Regina University, M.S., Pittsburg State University, B.A., University of Connecticut, Professional Experience: Armor, Infantry, Joint Operations, Civil Affairs, Foreign Area Specialist, (Turkey), Education, Phase I/II: I & II (SLC); JQO: Yes

      Professor Fred F. Farmer
      Ph.D., M.S., George Washington University, B.S., Ohio State University, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Naval Aviation, Systems Analysis, Planning and War Gaming, Phase I/II: pre-JPME (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor David E. Fay
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., Salve Regina University, B.S., New Hampshire College, Professional Experience: Naval Flight Officer, Joint Operations (JTF-4), Combined Operations (NATO Plans, CPWL staff), Phase I/II: I & II (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor Frank R. Fowler
      M.A., Salve Regina University, B.S., Roger Williams University, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Systems Engineering, Systems Analysis, Submarine Combat Systems, Engineering, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Thomas Hagen
      M.B.A., B.S., Oregon State University, Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, Joint Planning and Operations, Haiti Operation, CNO Fellow, Strategic Studies Group, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor David L. Hartsough
      M.A., National War College, M.B.A., University of North Florida, B.A., North Carolina State University Professional Experience: Maritime Aviation, NATO Operations, Phase I/II: I & II (NDU); JQO: No

      Professor Peter Lane
      Ph.D., University of Washington, B.S., U.S. Air Force Academy, Diploma, National Defense University Professional Experience: Aviation, History, Phase I/II: pre-JPME (NDU); JQO: No

      Professor Frederick W. Levin
      M.A., Boston University, B.S., Towson University, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Naval Intelligence, Joint Intelligence Operations, S.H.A.P.E., Political, Science, International Relations, Geopolitics, Phase I/II: pre-JPME; JQO: Yes

      Professor Raymond J. Mach
      M.S.A., George Washington University, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., Susquehanna University Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Maritime Prepositioning, Expeditionary Warfare, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor Richard R. Rager
      M.A., American University, B.A., University of Southern California, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Strategic Studies, Foreign Area Expertise, Middle East, South Asia Joint Planning, Phase I/II: pre-JPME (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor Tommie F. Rinard
      M.S., B.S., Louisiana State University, Diploma, National War College, Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, Naval Planning and Operations, Commercial Shipbuilding, Installation Operations, Phase I/II: pre-JPME (NDU); JQO: No

      Professor John M. Sappenfield
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.A., Webster University, B.A., University of North Carolina, Professional Experience: Joint and Interagency Planning, Joint Maritime Operations, Information Systems, Phase I/II: I (ILS) & II (JFSC); JQO: Yes

      Professor Howard P. Shores
      M.A., The Ohio State University, B.A., West Virginia University, Professional Experience: Special Operations, Terrorism/Counter Terrorism Operations, Amphibious, Operations, Joint Maritime Operations, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Jonathan W. Stull
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., Salve Regina University, B.A., Colgate University Professional Experience: Transformation Chair, NDU, Expeditionary Operations, Joint Operations, Interagency Coordination, Phase I/II: I & II (NDU); JQO: Yes

      Professor John F. Sussilleaux
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.A., George Washington University, B.S., College of the Holy Cross Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Naval Planning and Operations, Joint Operations, Operations Praying Mantis and Fiery Vigil, Phase I/II: pre-JPME; JQO: No

      Professor Dario Teicher
      M.A., Strategic Studies, Air War College, 2002, M.S., Telecommunications System Management, NPGS, 1991, B.S., Computer Science, State University of New York Maritime College, 1983, Professional Experience: Foreign Area Officer, Western Hemisphere, Surface Warfare, Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (JFSC); JQO: Yes

      Professor Joseph Thomas
      Ph.D., M.A., University of Maryland, B.S., B.A., University of South Carolina, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Coastal Warfare, Strike Group Training, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor D. Scott Thompson
      M.S., Salve Regina University, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Antisubmarine Warfare, Strategic Planning, Joint Maritime Operations, Phase I/II: I (NWC); JQO: No,

      Professor Michael R. Tollefson
      M.S., Villanova University, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.A., Salve Regina University, M.E., Naval Postgraduate School, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Submarine Warfare, Joint Operations, International Relations, PoliticalScience, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO No

      Professor Gary Ton
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., University of Arkansas, B.S., University of Mississippi, Professional Experience: Anti-Submarine Warfare, Naval Warfare, Joint Operations, Logistics, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Alan Wall
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., George Washington University, B.S., Ohio State University Professional Experience: Naval/Joint Intelligence, Surface Warfare, Joint Operations, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor James M. Warren
      M.P.A., Troy State University, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Joint Operations, Strategic Planning and Intelligence, Operations Analysis, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Larry A. Weaver
      Ph.D., M.A., Indiana University, B.S., U.S. Air Force Academy, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Aviation, Modeling and Simulation, Strategic Planning, Education, History Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Mark R. Wegge
      M.A., U.S. Army War College, B. A., Northern Illinois University, Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, NATO Planning, Interagency Planning, Joint Operations, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor William S. Williamson
      D.P.A., M.A., Nova Southeastern University, M.A., Georgetown University, M.S., University of Southern California, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Diploma, National War College, Professional Experience: Submarine Warfare, Special Operations, Joint Intelligence, Phase I/II: pre-JPME (NDU); JQO: No

      Professor David W. Willmann
      M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Diploma, U.S. Army War College Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, Joint Planning and Operations, Military History, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: No

      Strategy and Policy 

      Professor Arthur A. Adkins
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., Ohio State University, Professional Experience: Marine Corps Aviation, Air Warfare, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Porter R. Blakemore
      Ph.D., University of Georgia, M.A., James Madison University, A.B., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Professional Experience: U.S. Naval Aviation, Military History, European History Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Lawrence L. Brady
      M.A., Webster University, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.A., Georgia Southern College, Professional Experience: U.S. Marine Corps Aviator, Naval/Marine Corps Aviation, Joint and Combined Operations Phase I/II: I & II (SLC); JQO: Yes

      Professor George L. Breeden, II
      M.A.L.D., M.A., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: U.S. Navy Surface Warfare, ASW, Joint and Combined Operations, History, Political Science,Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor James J. Carafano
      Ph.D., M.A., Georgetown University, M.S.S., U.S. Army War College, B.S., U.S. Military Academy Diploma, U.S. Army Command & General Staff College, Professional Experience: U.S .Army Artillery, Terrorism, Homeland Security/Homeland Defense, Cold War, Phase I/II: I & II (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor William D. Clinton, III
      Ph.D., M.A., University of Virginia, B.A., Louisiana State University, Professional Experience: American Foreign Policy, International Relations, Cold War, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Steven J. Corvi
      Ph.D., Northwestern University, M.A., Salem State College, B.A., Framingham State College, Professional Experience: British Military History, World War I, Colonial America, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Michael Creswell
      Ph.D., M.A., University of Chicago, B.A., Indiana University, Professional Experience: European Security, International History, Cold War, Modern France, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Thomas J. Cutler
      M.A., Norwich University, B.A., Towson State University, Professional Experience: U.S. Navy Surface Warfare, Naval History, Western Civilization, World War II, Vietnam War, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor George B. Ellenberg
      Ph.D., University of Kentucky, M.A., B.A., Clemson University, Professional Experience: American and Military History, Education Administration, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Claudine L. Ferrell
      Ph.D., Rice University, M.A., B.A., Southwest Texas State University, Professional Experience: U.S. Legal/Constitutional History, U.S. History, Vietnam War, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Wilton B. Fowler
      Ph.D., M.A., Yale University, B.A., University of South Carolina, Professional Experience: U.S. Navy, Modern Diplomatic History, Hoover Institute Fellow, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Willard C. Frank, Jr.
      Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, A.M., College of William and Mary, A.B., Brown University Professional Experience: International Relations, Military and Naval History, European History Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Curtis P. Fritsch, III
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.B.A., M.P.A., University of Washington, B.A., University of California at Los Angeles, Professional Experience: U.S. Navy Surface Warfare, Budget Planning, Finance, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Robert J. Gennette
      M.A., B.S., San Diego State University, Professional  Experience: U.S. History, European History, Economics, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Stacy Bergstrom Haldi
      Ph.D., M.A., B.A., University of Chicago University, Professional Experience: International Relations, American Foreign Policy, Cold War, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Querine H. Hanlon
      Ph.D., M.A.L.D., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, B.S., Georgetown University Professional Experience: International Relations, International Law, International Security, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor William S. Johnson
      M.A.L.D., M.A., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Diploma, National War College, Professional Experience: U.S. Navy Surface Warfare, Military Plan, Policy, Operations, Phase I/II: I & II (NDU); JQO: Yes

      Professor Kelly C. Jordan
      Ph.D., M.A., Ohio State University, B.A., Virginia Military Institute, Diploma, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Professional Experience: U.S. Army Infantry, Military Science, Early Modern Europe, Modern U.S., History, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor John M. Kramer
      Ph.D., M.A., University of Virginia, B.A., LaSalle College University, Professional Experience: Political Science, Russian and East European Affairs, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Cyril M. Lagvanec
      Ph.D., Texas A&M University, M.A., Tulane University, B.A. Baylor University, Professional Experience: American and European Military History, American Revolution, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Adrian R. Lewis
      Ph.D., University of Chicago, M.A., University of Michigan, B.A., University of California at Berkeley Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: U.S. and Military History, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Bryan D. Lucas
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.A., Southern Connecticut State University, Professional Experience: U.S. Navy Surface Warfare, Military History, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor Thomas G. Mahnken
      Ph.D., M.A., Johns Hopkins University, B.A., University of Southern California, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: International Relations, Strategic Studies, U.S. Navy Intelligence Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor James R. McIntyre
      M.A., University of Illinois, B.A., Temple University, Professional Experience: American Revolution, Napoleonic Era, European Military History, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor James J. O’Rourke
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.A. Salve Regina University, M.B.A., University of North Florida B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: U.S. Navy Aviation, Naval Operations, Military History, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor David A. Rosenberg
      Ph.D., M.A., University of Chicago, B.A., The American University, Professional Experience: U.S. Navy Intelligence, Maritime Strategy, Naval History, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor George Satterfield
      Ph.D., University of Illinois, M.A., B.S., Illinois State University, Professional Experience: Early Modern Military/Political History, Napoleonic Era, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Calvin R. Scheidt
      M.P.A., Troy State University, M.B.A., National University, B.S., University of LaVerne, B.S., Saint Leo University, Diploma, Armed Forces Staff College, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, Diploma, Army Command and General Staff College Professional Experience: U.S. Navy Supply, Military Organization/Planning/Operations, Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (NDU); JQO: No

      Professor Lois J. Schoonover
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.A., University of Kentucky, Professional Experience: U.S. Navy, Asia-Pacific region, Strategy and Policy, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No

      Professor David A. Smith
      Ph.D., University of Missouri, M.A., B.A., Southwest Texas State University, Professional Experience: World War II, 20th Century Military History, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Stephen Stein
      Ph.D., Ohio State University, M.A., B.A., University of Colorado University, Professional Experience: U.S. Military and Naval History, Modern Middle East, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor George E. Thibault
      M.S., George Washington University, M.A., Boston University, B.S., Tufts University, Professional Experience: U.S. Navy Surface Warfare, Joint/Combined Operations, International Affairs, National War College Professor Emeritus, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Charles S. Thomas, II
      Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, M.A., B.A., University of Tennessee University, Professional Experience: Modern Germany, Naval and Military History, World War I & II, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Heath Twichell
      Ph.D., M.A., American University, B.S., United States Military Academy, Professional Experience: U.S. Army Infantry, Modern Europe, World War II, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Michael Vlahos
      Ph.D., M.A.L.D., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, A.B., Yale College Professional Experience: International Relations, Modern Terrorism, U.S. Foreign Policy, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Carrington Ward
      M.A., University of Chicago, B.A., Carleton College, Professional Experience: U.S. History and Foreign Policy, Cold War, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Edward H. Wiser
      M.A., Florida Atlantic University, M.B.A., Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, B.A., Fort Lauderdale University, Professional Experience: U.S. Army Artillery, World War I, U.S. Naval History, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No, CDE Faculty

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    7. Center for Naval Warfare Studies

      Dean, Center for Naval Warfare Studies
      Professor Robert C. Rubel
      M.A., Naval War College M.A., Salve Regina University B.A., University of Illinois Professional Experience: Military Planning and Decision Making, Naval Strategy Phase I/II: I (SLC) JSO: No

      Civilian Faculty

      Professor Robin M. Babb
      M.S., Industrial College of the Armed Forces, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, B.A., Stonehill College. Professional Experience: Naval Shore Communications, War Planning, Faculty Naval War College.  Phase I/II: I & II (ICAF); JQO: Yes

      Professor Walter A. Berbrick
      Ph.D Candidate, Northeastern University, M.A. Salve Regina University, B.A. Saint Peter’s College.  Professional Experience: Intelligence Analysis, International Law and Maritime Security Cooperation.  Phase I/II: I & II No; JQO: No

      Professor Heath (Hank) J. Brightman
      Ed.D., Seton Hall University, MCJ, Boston University, B.S., University of Massachusetts at Amherst. CAGS and CGS candidate in Expressive & Creative Arts and Holistic Leadership, Salve Regina. Professional Experience: Criminology, white collar crime, public program evaluation, corruption control, social science research methods, hyper-gaming and, application of game theory to irregular warfare, game design, operational leadership, biological and chemical warfare threat assessment and curriculum development/educational assessment.  Phase I/II: No. JQO: No.

      Professor William F. Bundy
      Ph.D., Salve Regina University, M.A., w/Distinction U.S. Naval War College, B.A., w/Distinction University of Hawaii, Professional Experience: Submarine Warfare, Anti-Submarine Warfare, NOBC: Strategic Planning - Nuclear Military-Political, NOBC: Strategic Weapons and Navigation, Graduate Research in Ballistic Missile Defense Strategy and Planning, Leadership and Ethics. Phase I/II: I (SLC) & II; JQO: Yes 

      Professor Stephen Burke, U.S. Navy
      B.S., Southhampton College.  Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Amphibious Operations, Expeditionary Operations, Shipbuilding Procurement.  Phase I/II: No;  JQO: No

      Professor Shawn W. Burns
      Ed.D Candidate, Johnson & Wales, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.A., Salem State College.  Professional Experience: Navy/Marine expeditionary operations, helicopter aviation, war game design.  Phase I/II: I (USNWC); JQO: No 

      Professor Michael S. Chase
      Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) M.A., Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) B.A., Brandeis University

      Professor Thomas J. Culora
      M.A., w/Distinction Naval War College, M.A., Naval Postgraduate School, B.F.A., The School of Visual Arts, New York, NY, Professional Experience: Amphibious Operations, Anti-Submarine Warfare, Helicopter Maritime Strike Operations, Strategy and Policy for CJCS and for OPNAV Staff (N5), Maritime Security Operations, Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief Operations, Art History Phase I/II: I (NWC) & II (AFSC); JQO: Yes 

      Professor David A. Della Volpe
      M.A., University of Alabama, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., Fairfield University. Professional Experience: Military History, Tactical Aviation, Military Planning. Phase I/II: I (USNWC); JQO: No

      Professor Chris C. Demchak
      Ph.D., M.A., University of California, M.P.A., Princeton University, B.A., University of California Professional Experience: International Security, Comparative Organization Theory, Diffusion of Advanced Technologies, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Peter Dombrowski
      Chair, Strategic Research Department, Ph.D., M.A., University of Maryland, B.A., Williams College Professional Experience: National Security Strategy and Policy, International Political Economy, European foreign and defense policies 

      Professor Stephen G. Downes-Martin
      Ph.D., London University, United Kingdom, Tripos III, Cambridge University, United Kingdom M.A., w/Distinction U.S. Naval War College, B.Sc., First Class Honors, London University, United Kingdom Professional Experience: Mathematics, Physics, Computer Science, Military Intelligence, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: No

      Professor Douglas R. Ducharme
      Ed.D Candidate, Johnson & Wales, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., University of San Diego, B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute.  Professional Experience: Mine Warfare, Search and Rescue, Operations Analysis, Infrastructure Protection.  Phase I/II: I (USNWC); JQO: No

      Professor Peter Dutton
      J.D., College of William and Mary, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., Boston University Professional Experience: Chinese Maritime Law, Naval Aviation, and Navy Judge Advocate General NOBC: N/A, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: N/A 

      Professor Bruce A. Elleman
      Ph.D., Columbia University, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.A., University of California, Berkeley Professional Experience: Military History, Phase I/II: (SLC); JQO: No 

      Professor Andrew Erickson
      Ph.D., M.A., Princeton University, B.A., Amherst College, Professional Experience: Chinese naval and military development, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No 

      Professor James R. FitzSimonds
      M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Industrial College of the Armed Forces, Professional Experience: U.S. Navy - Surface Line, Intelligence, Phase I/II: I (SLC) & II; JQO: Yes 

      Professor Lyle Goldstein
      Ph.D., Princeton University, M.A., Johns Hopkins, SAIS, B.A., Harvard University Professional Experience: Chinese naval and military development, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No 

      Professor Ahmed S. Hashim
      Ph.D., M.Sc., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.A., Warwick University, Coventry, England Professional Experience: Mideast Security, Terrorism Studies, Nonproliferation, Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 

      Professor John B. Hattendorf
      Chair, Maritime History Department, Hon. L.HD., Kenyon College, D.Phil., University of Oxford, United Kingdom, M.A., Brown University, B.A., Kenyon College, Professional Experience: USN surface warfare officer, Maritime and Naval History 

      Professor Thomas C. Hone
      Ph.D., M.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison, B.A., Ohio State University, Professional Experience: National Security Decision-Making, Acquisition Policy, European Security, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No 

      Professor Henry D. Kamradt
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.A., Duke University, Professional Experience: Anti Air Warfare, Surface Warfare, Anti-Submarine Warfare, Naval Intelligence, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No 

      Professor Craig M. Koerner
      Ph.D., M.A., University of Chicago, B.A., University of California at Los Angeles, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No 

      Professor Jeffrey M. Landsman
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.B.A., Providence College, B.A.,  Miami University, Ohio.  Professional Experience:  Surface Warfare, Force Tactical Action Officer, Weapons Systems.  Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Nan Li, Ph.D.
      Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, M.A., University of Missouri, Columbia, B.A., Jilin University, China Professional Experience: Chinese Civil-Military Relations, Chinese Naval Strategy, Chinese Foreign Policy, NOBC: N/A, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: N/A 

      Professor Carnes Lord
      Ph.D., B.A., Yale University, Ph.D., Cornell University, Professional Experience: Political Science Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Professor Terence E. Mahoney
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy.  Professional Experience: Security Assistance, Sea-basing, Officer Training, Undersea Warfare, War Gaming.  Phase I/II: I (USNWC) & II (AFSC); JQO: No 

      Professor Dennis Mandsager
      Chair, International Law Department, J.D., University of Kansas, M.A., Salve Regina University, B.A., Iowa State University, Professional Experience: Operational Law, Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: Yes 

      Professor Donald J. Marrin
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, C4I, War Gaming, Phase I/II: I (USNWC) & II (AFSC); JQO: No 

      Professor Michael G. Martin
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., University of Notre Dame.  Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Naval Aviation, War Gaming, Game Design.  Phase I/II: I (USNWC); JQO: No

      Professor William Murray
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.A., State University of New York (Cum Laude), Professional Experience: Wargame and Warfare Analysis, Phase I/II: I (USNWC) & II (JFSC); JQO: No 

      Professor Raul (Pete) Pedrozo (CAPT, USN, Ret.)
      Associate Professor, International Law Department, L.L.M., Georgetown University Law Center J.D., The Ohio State University College of Law, B.S., Eastern Kentucky University, Professional Experience: International Law, Operational Law, Maritime Law, Maritime Security, Special Assistant USDP (5 years), USPACOM Staff Judge Advocate (4 years), and JTF Operational Staffs, Phase I/II: No; JQO: Yes

      Professor Jonathan D. Pollack
      Ph.D., M.A., University of Michigan, B.A., Rutgers College, Professional Experience: Chinese foreign and defense policy; international relations of East Asia, Professor Carl V. Schloemann M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., University of Missouri, Columbia, Professional Experience: Amphibious Warfare, Surface Warfare, Homeland Security 

      Professor Carl Schloemann
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., University of Missouri.  Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Homeland Security/Homeland Defense.  Phase I/II: I (USNWC); JQO: No

      Professor Jonathan Stevenson
      J.D., Boston University School of Law, B.A., University of Chicago, Professional Experience: Lawyer Phase I/II: I (SLC); JQO: No 

      Ambassador Paul D. Taylor (Ret)
      M.P.A., Harvard University, B.A., Princeton University, Professional Experience: Naval Officer, Career Foreign Service Officer, Faculty U.S. Naval War College, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No 

      Professor (Emeritus) Frank R. Uhlig, Jr.
      B.A., Kenyon College, Professional Experience: Naval Publishing Analysis and History 

      Professor Warren M. Wiggins
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., University of Central Florida.  Professional Experience: CDR (USN) Ret, Anti-Air Warfare, Joint Logistics, Homeland Security/Homeland Defense.  Phase I/II: I (USNWC); JQO: No 

      Mr. James G. Willard
      M.A., w/Honors Iona College, New York, B.A., Boston College Professional Experience: Intelligence Campaign Planning, World Politics, Asymmetric Warfare Phase I/II: No; JQO: No 

      Professor Andrew C. Winner
      Ph.D., M.A., University of Maryland, M.A, The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, B.A., Hamilton College, Professional Experience: National Security Strategy and Policy, Nonproliferation/counter-proliferation, Middle East, South Asia, Interagency process Phase I/II: No; JQO: No 

      Military Faculty

      Deputy Dean, Center for Naval Warfare Studies
      Colonel Brian S. Pagel, U.S. Marine Corps
      Deputy Dean, CNWS, M.A., The George Washington University, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Communications Officer, Phase I/II: II (SLC); JQO: Yes 

      Lieutenant Commander H. Scott Brandon, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U. S. Naval War College, B.S., Texas A&M University.  Professional Experience: Surface Warfare Operations, Amphibious Operations, Tactical and Operational Staff, Dutch Operational Staff.  Phase I/II: I (USNWC); JQO: No 

      LtCol George Cadwalader, Jr., U.S. Marine Corps Faculty, International Law Department; J.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison (with honors); B.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Professional Experience: Criminal Law; Civil Law; International Law, Operational Law/Staff experience at Station/Division/MEF levels.  Yes, JPME Phase I (USMC Command and Staff Graduate (DEP) 2006); JQO: Yes

      Captain H. David Clopp, U.S. Navy
      M.S., Joint Military Intelligence College, B.S. US Naval Academy.  Professional Experience: Undersea Warfare, Expeditionary Warfare.  Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Commander Christopher E. Gray, U.S. Navy
      M.A., Salve Regina University, Diploma, U.S. Naval War College, B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  Professional Experience: Surface Warfare Operations, Tactical and Operational Staff, Education.  Phase I/II: I (USNWC); JQO: No 

      Lieutenant Colonel Hunter Kellogg, U.S. Marine Corps
      B.A. University of Colorado.  Professional Experience: Combat TACAIR Operations, HVT Targeting, Tactical and Operational Coalition Staff.  Phase I/II: I (USMC Command & Staff College non-resident) ; JQO: No

      Commander James Kraska, U.S. Navy
      Howard S. Levie Chair of Operational Law S.J.D.,LL.M., University of Virginia, J.D., Indiana University School of Law, B.A., Mississippi State University, Professional Experience: International Law; Piracy, Arctic Law, Phase I/II: I (NWCCS); JQO: Yes

      Commander Dustin Martin, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U. S. Naval War College, B.A., Norwich University.  Professional Experience: P-3C Naval Flight Officer, ASW Operations, Tactical and Operational Staff Duty.  Phase I/II: I (USNWC); JQO: No 

      Lieutenant Commander Nicholas Miller, U.S. Navy
      B.S., Widener University.  Professional Experience: Submarine Warfare.  Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Commander Gordon Muir, U.S. Navy
      B.A., Middlebury College.  Professional Experience: Naval Aviator, OPNAV N88 Staff, budgeting, future plans and acquisition.  Phase I/II: I (ACSC non-resident); JQO: N/A

      Commander Andrew Norris, U.S. Coast Guard
      J.D., University of Florida; B.A., University of Virginia, Professional Experience: SJA, military judge, marine casualty investigator, SWO qual, Phase I/II: neither; JQO: No

      Commander Robert F Perry, U.S. Navy
      B.A., Providence College.  Professional Experience: Deputy Comptroller, Joint Specialty Financial Management, Manpower Systems Analysis Management, Surface Warfare, Sealift.  Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Commander Cameron P. Ratkovic, U.S. Navy
      M.A., United States Naval War College, MBA, University of Arizona, B.S., Louisiana State University. Professional Experience: Surface Warfare and Riverine Operations, Tactical and Operational Staff. Phase I/II: II (USNWC); JQO: No

      Commander Walter S. Topp, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U. S. Army War College, M.A., Cleveland State University, B.A., John Carroll University.  Professional Experience: Coast Guard Officer, Naval Officer, Maritime Law Enforcement, Surface Warfare, Security Assistance, War Gaming.  Phase I/II: II (AWC); JQO: No

      Commander Jeffrey W. Uhde, U.S. Navy
      M.B.A., New Hampshire College, B.S. U.S. Naval Academy.  Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, Maritime Patrol and Anti Submarine Warfare.  Phase I/II: No; JQO: No

      Colonel Daria P. Wollschlaeger, U.S. Army
      Deputy Chair, International Law Department, L.L.M., Georgetown University, L.L.M., U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s School, J.D., University of Detroit School of Law, M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.A. x3, University of South Florida, Professional Experience: International Law, Operational Law, Administrative Law, Staff Judge Advocate, HQDA and Operational Staffs, Phase I/II: I (CGSC) & II (NWC); JQO: Yes 

      Lieutenant Colonel Eric W. Young, U.S. Army
      L.L.M., U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s School, J.D., Marquette University Law School, M.A., College of Naval Command and Staff, B.A., Purdue University, Professional Experience: International Law, Operational Law, Administrative Law, Tactical and Operational Staffs, Phase I/II: I Yes (ILE/CNCS 2010); JQO: Yes

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    8. College of Operational & Strategic Leadership

      Dean, College of Operational & Strategic Leadership
      Professor Thomas M. Bayley
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College B.S., Texas A&M University Professional Experience: Submarines, ASW, Nuclear C2, Joint Operations, Crisis Response Phase I/II: Yes; JSO: Yes

      Civilian Faculty

      Professor Gene R. Andersen
      Associate Professor, Stockdale Group, M.A., w/Distinction U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Leadership Development, Helicopter Aviation, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No 

      Professor Sean J. Carroll
      Assistant Research Professor, Officer Leadership Programs, M.A., Boston University, B.A., Boston College, Professional Experience: Flag/General Officer Education, Aviation C2, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No 

      Professor Martin L. Cook
      Admiral James Bond Stockdale Professor of Professional Military Ethics, Ph.D., M.A., University of Chicago, B.A., University of Illinois, Professional Experience: Teaching philosophy, ethics, religious studies, Phase I/II: I; JQO: N/A 

      Professor Timothy J. Demy
      Associate Professor; Professional Military Ethics, Ph.D., M.A., Salve Regina University, Th.D., Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary, M.St., University of Cambridge (Honors), M.A., Naval War College (President’s Honor Graduate), M.A., The University of Texas at Arlington, B.A., Texas Christian University, Professional Experience: Ethics, Religion and International Relations, Chaplain Phase I/II: I; JQO: N/A 

      Professor Richard J. Findlay
      Director, Operational Level Programs, M.A. ,U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy Professional Experience: Leadership, Marine Aviation, Warfare Concepts, Phase I/II: Yes; JQO: Yes 

      Professor G. Jeffrey Fullerton
      Associate Professor, Maritime Staff Operators Course, M.A., w/Distinction U.S. Naval War College, B.S.M.E., Tulane University, Professional Experience: 30 year Navy career, Leadership, Surface Warfare Officer (3 ships command tours), Air Defense, Operational Level Planning/execution, Phase I/II: I & II (NWC); JQO: Yes 

      Professor Brent J. Griffin
      Associate Professor, Maritime Staff Operators Course and Assist and Assess Team, M.A., U. S. Naval War College, M.A., U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, B.A., SUNY Potsdam, Professional Experience: Intelligence, Phase I/II: I & II; JQO: No 

      Professor James T. Harrington
      Associate Professor, Maritime Staff Operators Course, M.A., U. S. Naval War College, M.B.A., Bryant College, B.A., College of the Holy Cross, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Political-Military Affairs, Joint and Combined (NATO), Operations, Military Doctrine, Education and Training Phase I/II: Yes; JQO: Yes 

      Professor Olenda E. Johnson
      Associate Professor of Strategic Leadership & Leader Development, College of Operational & Strategic Leadership, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, MBA, Florida A&M University, B.S. Florida A&M University, Professional disciplines: Organizational Behavior and Organizational Studies

      Professor Sean P. Henseler
      Maritime Staff Operators Course, J.D., The Catholic University Columbus School of Law, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.A., Georgetown University, B.S., Babson College, Professional Experience: Naval Intelligence, International and Operational Law, and Rule of Law, Detention Operations, Operational Level Planning, Education/Training, Phase I/II: I: Yes & II: Instructor (NWC); JQO: NO 

      Professor Richard Keltner
      Assistant Professor, Maritime Staff Operators Course, B.B.A., Howard Payne University, Professional Experience: Naval Aviator, ASW, Navy/Joint Operations Planner, JFACC, Fleet Staff, CTF Staff, CNATRA Staff, Phase I/II: I: currently in progress; JQO: No 

      Professor Richard J. Krystof
      Associate Research Professor; Director, Maritime Staff Operators Course Battle Lab, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, College of Naval Command and Staff, B.S., Daniel Webster College, Nashua, NH, Professional Experience: Naval Aviator, Maritime Patrol and ASW, Combatant Commander Staff, War Gamer, Phase I/II: I; JQO: No 

      Professor John P. Mangold
      Associate Professor; Director, Maritime Staff Operators Course, Ed.D., (candidate), Liberty University M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., Chapman University, B.A., Temple University, Professional Experience: Leadership, Amphibious Warfare, Curriculum Development, Operational Planning, Logistics, Phase I/II: Yes; JQO: Yes 

      Professor James Marion
      M.B.A., University of Rhode Island, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, B.S., St. John Fisher College, Professional Experiences: Surface Warfare, Joint Operations, Operational Level Planning, Doctrine Development, Phase I/II: I & II; JQO: Yes 

      Professor Robert E. McCabe, III
      Associate Professor, Maritime Staff Operators Course, M.A., Johns Hopkins University, M.A. U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Naval Warfare, Naval Operations, Coalition Operations, Phase I/II: I; JQO: Yes 

      Professor John C. Meyer
      Assistant Dean of Academics for Leadership, M.A., w/Distinction U.S. Naval War College, M.M.A., University of Rhode Island, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Leadership, Surface Warfare, Warfare Concepts, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: No 

      Professor James P. Murray
      Associate Professor, Maritime Staff Operators Course, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Leadership, Naval Aviation, ASW, Joint Operations, Maritime Operations, Educational Administration, Phase I/II: I (ILC) & II (JFSC); JQO: Yes 

      Professor David P. Polatty, IV
      Associate Professor, Maritime Staff Operators Course, M.A., U.S. Naval War College (Highest Distinction) B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Naval Aviation, ASW, Combined/Joint Operations, Maritime Operations, Phase I/II: Yes (Enrolled); JQO: No 

      Professor Francisco K Rosario
      Associate Professor, Maritime Staff Operators Course, M.Ed., Providence College, M.A., Air Command and Staff College, B.S., University Of Arizona, Professional Experience: Surface & Amphibious Warfare, PSI, EMIO, Combined, Joint and Interagency CNT/CD Operations, Crisis and Deliberate Planning, Phase I/II: I & II; JQO: Yes 

      Professor Paul W. Schmidle
      Associate Professor, Maritime Staff Operators Course, M.S., Hawaii Pacific University, MSIS,  B.S., University of Long Island, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Knowledge/ Information Management, C2 Systems, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No 

      Professor Carlos A. Sotomayor
      Associate Professor, Maritime Staff Operators Course, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Leadership, Tactical Electronic Warfare, Joint Operations, Interagency/Foreign Policy & Security Assistance, Phase I/II: I; JQO: No 

      Professor Richard D. Suttie
      Assistant Dean of Academics for Corporate Affairs, B.S., University of Southern California, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, M.A., w/Distinction U.S. Naval War College, Federal Executive Fellowship – Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, National Security Fellowship – Maxwell School of Public Policy, Syracuse University, Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, ASW, Joint Operations, Acquisition Professional (ACAT III PM), Human Capital Management, Joint Capabilities Assessment, Strategic Planning, Phase I/II: I (ILC); JQO: NO 

      Professor Jonathan E. Will
      Associate Professor; Deputy Chief-Assist and Assess Team (AAT), M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Leadership, Surface Warfare, Operational Level Staff, Joint Operations, Ballistic Missile Defense Operations, Nuclear Propulsion, Phase I/II: I; JQO: No 

      Military Faculty

      Commander Jeffrey M. Alves, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, B.A., Boston University, Professional Experience: Naval Aviation, Operational Level Staff, Operational Planning, Crisis Response, Phase I/II: I; JQO: No 

      Commander Philip J. Beckman, U.S. Navy
      B.S. Mathematics, United States Naval Academy, M.S., Operations Research, United States Postgraduate School M.E.M. Masters in Engineering Management, Old Dominion University, Professional Experience - Submarines Phase I/II – No: JQP – No 

      Captain Edward J. D’Angelo, U.S. Navy
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College, M.S., Central Michigan University, B.S., Pennsylvania State University, Professional Experience: Helicopter Aviation, Carrier Operations, Coalition Operations, Phase I/II: Yes; JQO: No 

      Commander Eric A. Dukat, U.S. Navy
      B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, Professional Experience: Surface Warfare, Joint Operations, TMD/BMD, TASW, NATO & Coalition Ops, Major Staffs (CCDR, Fleet), Strike Group, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No 

      Captain Paul P. McKeon, U.S. Navy
      B.S. from University of Wisconsin-Madison, MBA from University of Maryland, Masters in National Security Strategy from National War College. Phase I/II: I; JQO: NO. Professional Experience: EA-6B Naval Flight Officer, with additional tours at Naval Strike Warfare Center, Navy Personnel Command, U.S. Central Command, and THIRD Fleet.

      Lieutenant Commander Brett J. Morash, U.S. Navy
      B.S., Massachusetts Maritime Academy, M.A., Framingham State College, M.A., U.S. Naval War College, Professional Experience: Joint Operations, Battle Group Operations, BMD, CNO Strategic Studies, Group, Interagency, Operational Level Planning, Phase I/II: I; JQO: No 

      Captain John J. Schneider, U.S. Navy
      B.S., Holy Cross, Professional Experience: Leadership, Submarines, Joint, Nuclear C2, Phase I/II: No; JQO: No  

      Lieutenant Commander  Ellen J. Sharp, JAGC, U.S. Navy
      J.D., Loyola University New Orleans, School of Law, B.A., University of Southern Mississippi, Professional Experience: Military Justice, Administrative Law, Ethics Counselor, Legal Advisor for Major GCM, Aircraft Carrier, Kunia Regional Security Operations Center/NSGA Kunia, Naval Justice School Instructor, Phase I/II: I (Enrolled); JQO: No

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    9. Maritime Advanced Warfighting School

      Director: Captain Patrick Molenda, U.S. Navy.
      M.A., National Security and Stategic Studies, U.S. Naval War College; B.S., Political Science, Jacksonville Univ. Professional Experience: Aviation (HSL); Phase I/II: I(NWC) and II (AFSC); JQO: Yes. 

      Deputy: Professor Paul A. Romanski.
      *Certificate Advanced Graduate Studies, Salve Regina University. M.A., University of Illinois. M.A., U.S. Naval War College. B.A., University of Notre Dame. Professional Experience: U.S. Navy Surface Warfare, Joint and Multinational Operational Planning and Logistics; Phase I/II: I (SLC); JSO: No.
      *Pre-doctoral diploma, ABD. 

      Professor Michael R. Croskrey.
      M.S., Naval Post Graduate School; B.S., Iowa State University. Professional Experience: Aviation; Phase I/II: I (ILC); JSO: No 

      Commander James Dalton, U.S. Navy.
      M.A., National Security and Strategic Studies, U. S. Naval War College; B.S., Secondary Education/History, University of Missouri. Professional Experience: Naval Aviation (VA/VF/VFA); Phase I (SLC/NWC), JQO: No. 

      Professor Jerry Duffy.
      M.A., U.S. Naval War College; B.S., Dowling College. Professional Military Experience: Naval Aviation (Helicopters). Phase I: ILC; JSO: Yes 

      Lieutenant Colonel Tye Wallace, U.S. Marine Corps.
      M.M.A.S. Theater Operations, School of Advanced Military Studies; M.A.
      National Security and Strategic Studies, U.S. Naval War College; B.S., Mechanical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Professional Experience: Infantry and Planning, Phase I/II: I (CGSC) and II (NWC). JQO:No

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  20. Building Data and Maps

    Bldg. No. 

    Name

    Gross Sq Ft (GSF) 

    Built/Renovated

    1

    Luce Hall

    36,128

    1892, 1988 (Partial), 2010

    1A

    Pringle Hall

    42,228

    1934, 1992 (Partial), 2007 (Partial)

    3

    Mahan Hall

    38,013 1

    1904, 1993 (Partial), (Additions) 1938, 1966

    10

    Founders Hall

    17,736

    1819, 1984, 2010 (partial)

    27

    McCarty Little Hall

    109,821

    1999, 2011 (roof)

    29

    Sims Hall

    118,664

    1904, 1999 (Partial)

    52

    Schonland Hall

    17,700

    1918, 1985, 2008 (Partial)

    686

    Conolly Hall

    141,290

    1974, 2005 (roof)

    683

    Spruance Hall

    84,280

    1972 2008 (Partial)

    991

    Hewitt Hall

    159,914

    1976, 2007 (Partial), 2008 (Partial)

    1284

    Evans Hall

    21,500

    1990 2008

    12

    Warehouse 12

    30,000

    1943, 2009 (partial)

    13

    Warehouse 13

    15,000

    1943, 2009 (partial)

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  21. Accreditation

        The Naval War College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges Commission on Institutions of Higher Education. Additionally, the College is accredited to deliver Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) through the Process for Accreditation of Joint Education (PAJE). This is a CJCS-approved process for the oversight, assessment, and improvement of the JPME programs at intermediate and senior colleges.

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  22. Inquiries about the Institution

    Inquiries about the Naval War College can be addressed to the Office of Public Affairs at the following:

    Phone:   (401) 841-2220

    E-mail:   pao@usnwc.edu

    Address:
    Naval War College
    Office of Public Affairs
    686 Cushing Road
    Newport RI 02841-1207

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