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140325-N-OD445-323  NEWPORT, R.I.  (March 25, 2014)  Members from the maritime national and international community participate in the Maritime   Security, Seapower and Trade symposium at U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, R.I.   The three-day event served as an opportunity to promote thinking and discussion on maritime   security and seapower.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd   Class Monique LaRouche/Released)
140325-N-OD445-323 NEWPORT, R.I. (March 25, 2014) Members from the maritime national and international community participate in the Maritime Security, Seapower and Trade symposium at U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, R.I. The three-day event served as an opportunity to promote thinking and discussion on maritime security and seapower. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Monique LaRouche/Released)


By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Monique LaRouche, U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs
March 31, 2014

NEWPORT, R.I. – Sixty-five members from the international and national maritime community attended the three-day symposium on Maritime Security, Seapower, and Trade at the U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, R.I., March 24-26.

Maritime Strategy, Evolving Role of Sea Power in Peacetime, Naval Strategists’ Perspectives, Shrinking Ice Caps and Shorter Sea Routes, and Non-Government Organizations in Maritime Domain were the topic discussions of the five-panel open forum.

The role of the event is to develop knowledge in new areas, further thinking and present issues through the discussion on the participants’ working papers.

“The symposium working papers are important for understanding the types of mission combatant commanders will execute and the types of equipment and training the Navy must provide to support these missions,” said Derek S. Reveron, the symposium Chair and National Security Affairs professor at the NWC.

The event also offered a chance for three students, Lt. Cmdr. Gregory C. Keeney, Cmdr. Christian D. Boll and Lt. Erik Figuero, from the NWC Advanced Studies in Naval Strategy course to present their thesis papers for review. Intellectuals from institutions such as Harvard, Oxford, Brown and Salve Regina provided the students feedback on their analysis of current seapower and maritime strategy implications for the U.S. Navy.

“It reinforces the Naval War College’s values and founding tenants, and that is what should be leveraged, that is what the war college is designed to do,” said Keeney.

The event presented an opportunity for members of the maritime community to join together and to reflect on the importance of classic maritime thought and how changes in the shipping industry, trade patterns, and non-state use of the oceans impact future naval operations.

“This has allowed me to look at something beyond its face value and what really caused this and what are the potential outcomes and ramifications,” said Boll about his experience at the college. Boll was able to study and explore the use of alternative energy in domestic energy production.

“It expands your view and allows you to see the connections between events and their causes in a much broader way.”

Participants offered the students ways to improve on naval thinking and strategy development and to access strategic and operational concepts to overcome challenges.

“You come here and have the opportunity to think,” said Keeney.