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NEWPORT, R.I. (Sept. 17, 2013) Dr. James Holmes, professor for U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, R.I., provides a lecture as part of the Strategy and War Reserve Officer Course at NWC. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Pat Migliaccio/Released)
NEWPORT, R.I. (Sept. 17, 2013) James Holmes, professor for U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, R.I., provides a lecture as part of the Strategy and War Reserve Officer Course at NWC. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Pat Migliaccio/Released)


By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Pat Migliaccio, U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs
Sept. 20, 2013

NEWPORT, R.I. – Sixty-five reserve officers from the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard completed a two-week Strategy and War Reserve Officer Course at the U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, R.I., Sept. 20.

“The course gives you a different angle on how to look at strategy and how the services work together to achieve a cohesive plan,” said Air Force Maj. Richard Morneau, a student currently enrolled in the class. “It gives you a bag of tools you can use to make better decisions based on whatever issue you need to tackle.”

The course is one of three modules needed by officers to complete their Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) Phase I qualifications, which focuses on warfighting within the context of operational art. JPME is designed to produce fully qualified and inherently joint officers suitable for joint command and staff responsibilities. Supported by faculty from NWC's strategy and policy department and College of Distance education, the class acquaints officers with the fundamentals of foreign policy from an historical and contemporary perspective.

“Students study the strategy of war and focus on decisions made at the highest levels of interaction between top level civilian and military leadership, “said Cmdr. Bryan Williams, course coordinator and military professor of strategy and policy at NWC. “The course then forces students to think and improve their strategic thinking.”

The course is comprised of readings, lectures and seminars focusing on strategic and political interests and goals and the way diplomacy and military force has been and may be used to serve those interests and goals. Students use historical case studies in an analytical study of war and strategic choices during various historical conflicts.

“This is a great opportunity to think hard and put our strategic and writing skills to work in a non-threatening environment,” said Coast Guard Cmdr. James Robinson, a current student in the course. “I found that regardless of the subject matter, the process of planning together is more than 50% of the solution.”

The students gained a broader understanding of the strategic environment and enhanced their capability to participate in it.

“Students really enjoy the class,” added Williams. “It gives them practice time so when they’re put in positions effecting operations, they think strategically and look at both the short and long term implications of their decisions.”


Posted by Daniel S. Marciniak