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NEWPORT, R.I. - As part of 125th anniversary year activities, the Naval War College held a special academic session on March 22, to recognize the historic relationship between Theodore Roosevelt and the college, while also acknowledging Theodore Roosevelt's contribution to the nation's maritime heritage.
 
Dr. John Hattendorf, the college's Ernest J. King Professor of Maritime History, lectured on the relationships between Theodore Roosevelt, the college's first president Stephen B. Luce, and one of the college's original faculty members, Alfred T. Mahan, whose lectures were published in 1890 as The Influence of Seapower upon History, 1660-1783. Mahan's views would greatly influence the thinking of leaders such as Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge, and through them and others, help shape America's destiny at the turn of the century.
 
Actor James France performed a character portrayal of Theodore Roosevelt, covering significant events of Roosevelt's life.
 
Dr. James Holmes, a professor in the college's Strategy and Policy Department, examined Theodore Roosevelt's impact of on the maritime affairs and international relations of the United States.
 
On October 6, 1884, Secretary of the Navy William E. Chandler signed General Order 325, which began by simply stating: "A college is hereby established for an advanced course of professional study for naval officers, to be known as the Naval War College." The order went on to assign "the principal building on Coaster's Harbor Island, Newport, R.I."-the Newport Asylum for the Poor, built in 1820-to its use and "Commodore Stephen B. Luce . . . to duty as president of the college." Such were the humble beginnings of what is now the oldest continuing institution of its kind in the world.
 
The Naval War College is a graduate-level professional military education and research institution in its 125th year of educating leaders. The college's missions today are developing strategic and operational leaders, helping the Chief of Naval Operations define the future Navy, strengthening maritime security cooperation and supporting combat readiness.
 
From Naval War College Public Affairs