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NEWPORT, R.I. – Naval War College (NWC) professor Bruce A. Elleman published his new book, “Moscow and the Emergence of Communist Power in China, 1925-30” on Jan. 30.

This book examines the rise of Communist power in China during the interwar period, focusing especially on the role of the Soviet Union and the 1927 Nanchang Uprising.
 
“American students of Chinese warfare, and especially of the People's Liberation Army, will be particularly interested in how the Chinese Communists were manipulated by Soviet leaders,” said Elleman. “Through the intermediary of the Moscow-based Communist International, the Chinese Communists served the Soviet leaders' own purposes rather than the specific needs of the Chinese Communists.”

The book is part of the Routledge Studies in the Modern History of Asia series.  During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries Asia has undergone immense and far reaching changes: war, revolution, occupation, industrialization. This series includes in-depth research on aspects of economic, political and social history of individual countries as well as more broad-reaching analyses of regional issues.

“My eight years at the Naval War College, five of them as a professor in the Maritime History Department, as well as my experiences as a NWC student during 2003 and 2004, have provided me with an unparalleled education in the relationship between policy and strategy,” said Elleman. “This education proved crucial while writing this book about the origins of the People's Liberation Army.”

Elleman is a Research Professor at the Maritime History Department of the U.S. Naval War College. He received his M.A. from the college in National Security and Strategic Studies, with Distinction in 2004.  Elleman is also the author of “Modern Chinese Warfare, 1795-1989,” “Japanese-American Civilian Prisoner Exchanges and Detention Camps, 1941-45,” and other books dealing with Sino-Soviet relations and Chinese military and naval history.

By Matthew Breen, Naval War College Public Affairs