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Professors Jim Cook and Larry McCabe of the National Security Affairs (NSA) Department recently traveled to Jinja, Uganda to present a series of lectures to senior military officers from Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, and South Sudan attending the Uganda People’s Defense Force (UPDF) Senior Command and Staff College. The lecture series addressed the importance of security assessments, strategy development, African strategic futures, and operational concept development and helped the students and faculty place military operations in a global and regional strategic context.
 
Professors McCabe (left) and Cook (right) meet with COL Austine Kamanyire, Deputy Director of the Uganda People's Defense Force Senior Command and Staff College in Kimaka, Uganda in the city of Jinja located on Lake Victoria at the source of the Nile River. The visit (18-20 July, 2011) provided senior military officers from six central African countries a strategic perspective on military operations.The visit was conducted July 18-20 at the request of the U.S. Embassy in Kampala, the Staff College and The United States Africa Command (AFRICOM) and funded through the AFRICOM J3/5 engagement program. The Naval War College (NWC) first visited the UPDF Staff College in 2009 at the request of Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa, Djibouti to help strengthen the then recently established Professional Military Education institution and to provide a series of lectures during the opening week of a 10-month course. The effort was well received by the students and faculty as well as the U.S. Embassy country team in Kampala.  NWC faculty returned to Uganda in 2010 and 2011 to help kick-off each year’s course of instruction.
 
Col. Austine Kamanyire, the College Deputy Director, commenting on the most recent visit, said “this visit was perfect timing for our students. They would not have understood these ideas six months ago. Now they appreciate the importance of the strategic perspective.”
 
Citing the importance of maritime security to land-locked nations such as Uganda, Rwanda, South Sudan and Burundi, McCabe said “these countries have security concerns on their rivers and lakes. They also depend heavily on the security and stability of the port facilities of nations through which most of their imports flow, such as Kenya and Tanzania. Maritime security is important to almost every country in today’s globalized economy.”
 
The Naval War College supports theater engagement and security assistance programs of both U.S. Naval Forces Africa and AFRICOM in countries throughout the continent including Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, Namibia and Botswana among others. 
 
From National Security Affairs
Posted by Brie Lyons