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NEWPORT, R.I. -- The Naval War College Press is pleased to present the Winter 2011 issue of the Naval War College Review.

Cover of Naval War College Review - Winter 2011. Wilma Parker’s The Amazing Grace, an oil painting that hung in an exhibition of a selection of the artist’s work at the Naval War College Museum from August to November 2010 (and which the author subsequently donated to the Naval War College Foundation).In this issue:

The Naval War College Review was established in 1948 and is a forum for discussion of public policy matters of interest to the maritime services. The forthright and candid views of the authors are presented for the professional education of the readers. Articles published are related to the academic and professional activities of the Naval War College. They are drawn from a wide variety of sources in order to inform, stimulate, and challenge readers, and to serve as a catalyst for new ideas. Articles are selected primarily on the basis of their intellectual and literary merits, timeliness, and usefulness and interest to a wide readership. The thoughts and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and are not necessarily those of the U.S. Navy  or the Naval War College.

Cover
Wilma Parker’s The Amazing Grace, an oil painting that hung in an exhibition of a selection of the artist’s work at the Naval War College Museum from August to November 2010 (and which the author subsequently donated to the Naval War College Foundation). The painting commemorates the commissioning of USS Hopper (DDG 70) on 6 September 1997, to which the artist was invited. She found the ceremony an especially “joyous occasion,” she writes, as the ship had been named for Grace Hopper (1906–92), a pioneering computer scientist and “the incredible Rear Admiral . . . who computerized the Navy.” Rear Admiral Hopper famously invented the word “debugging,” on the occasion of actually removing a moth from within the early Harvard Mark I computer. The new destroyer, writes Parker, “is affectionately known as the ‘Amazing Grace,’ and it’s the joy of her achievement, expressed in the jaunty flags and good wishes on Commissioning Day, that I hoped to capture in this work.” The Amazing Grace, 36 by59 inches, oil on linen, by Wilma Parker. Collection of the artist. Photograph courtesy of the Naval War College Museum.

From Naval War College Press