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by Margaret Maurer, U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs

Professor Thomas G. Mahnken, Strategy and Policy Department edited the recently released book, "Competitive Strategies for the 21st Century: Theory, History, and Practice."NEWPORT, R.I. – Thomas G. Mahnken, a professor with the Strategy and Policy Department at the U.S. Naval War College (NWC), edited a new book, “Competitive Strategies for the 21st Century: Theory, History, and Practice.”
 
Mahnken, the current Jerome E. Levy Chair of Economic Geography and National Security at the NWC, also wrote the opening chapter, “Thinking about Competitive Strategies.”
 
The book, published by Stanford University Press, begins by looking at the theoretical concepts of strategy between competing states - a condition that is neither conflict nor cooperation. It then applies that theory through case studies of competing states, both in the Cold War and current US-China relations.
 
"This book brings together a world-class group of scholars and practitioners to examine the challenges posed by the rise of China as well as options for the United States and our allies to continue to promote stability in a more challenging environment," said Mahnken.
 
Contributors included NWC professors Michael S. Chase, Andrew Erickson, James R. Fitzsimonds, James R. Holmes, Bradford A. Lee and Toshi Yoshihara.

"This book makes an enormous contribution to the strategic studies literature,” said Eric S. Edelman,  Distinguished Fellow, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, as a review of the publication. “It is mandatory reading for anyone interested in grand strategy, the end of the Cold War, the emergence of China as a great power and the influence of the Pentagon's legendary Andrew Marshall on the study of strategy.”
 
Mahnken has held positions in both the government and the private sector, including serving as the deputy assistant secretary of defense for policy planning from 2006 to 2009.
 
He has a master’s degree and doctorate in international affairs from John Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, where he is now a visiting scholar.
 
In 2009, he was awarded the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service.

NOTE: The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not reflect the position of the U.S. Naval War College, the Department of the Navy or Department of Defense or any other organization of the U.S. government.

Posted by Cmdr. Carla M. McCarthy